Scientific Text Revision Exercise (2)


Scientific Text Revision Exercise (2)

 

After studying Scientific Text Revision Exercise (1), please revise the following text (taken from the literature review section of your mid term assignment). Make sure you include all necessary points to revise. Write down your final (revised) text in the reply section below. Deadline: Monday, May 12, 2014. Good luck!

 

The Nature of Motivation

Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. We are all motivated by many different things. It is influenced by our past, present and the future. Motivation is the light for learning. Motivation is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri & Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia, as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s (1972) theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri & Intharaksa (2011) integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. Then, according Holt, (as cited by Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

28 Comments

  1. Name : Thurma Mayasari
    SIN : 111.21.500.30
    Bs – A

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is the reason behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. Motivation is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motivate to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri & Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation are combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia, as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s (1972) theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30).

    Integrative and instrumental motivation are to show obvious goals of learners in language learning and widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). Stated of Choosri & Intharaksa (2011) integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to related the language of a community different than yours. It further represented an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words,integrative motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language and speak the language, admire the culture to familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire, to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passed an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integrative motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. Then, Holt, (as cited by Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical of a second language. The purpose of instrumental motivation acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, whereas a little and social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  2. Name: Annery Fienta
    SIN: 1112150024
    Class: A

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is the light for learning and what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Choosri and Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p. 4). According to Garcia, (as cited in Gardner & Lambert, 1972) there are two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p. 30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations. Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri and Intharaksa (2011), integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community. Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals, i.e. passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) claimed that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary and less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. Then, according Holt, (as cited in Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation, the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characterized by second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be concluded that instrumental motivation refers to a desire to get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

    1. Name: Annery Fienta
      SIN: 1112150024
      Class: A

      The Nature of Motivation

      Motivation is the light for learning and what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Choosri and Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p. 4). According to Garcia, (as cited in Gardner & Lambert, 1972) there are two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p. 30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

      Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri and Intharaksa (2011), integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

      Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals, i.e. passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) claimed that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary and less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. Then, according Holt, (as cited in Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation, the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characterized by second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be concluded that instrumental motivation refers to a desire to get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  3. PUTRI WARINAGIA
    11 121 500 36

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is all of the reasons behind why we do and revolve around intentionally. We are motivated through many different things. It is influenced by our past, present and the future. It is the light for learning, the guidance for acting: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives; the response we make to challenge in situations where success or failure is possible. Chossri & Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that “motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and gives raising to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals” (p.4). According to Garcia’s (as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s, 1972, p.30) theory, that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations. Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri & Intharaksa (2011), integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integrative-motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language, such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumental-motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary and they are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integrative-motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. Then, according Holt (as cited by Hudson, 2001), instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation, the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. It could be concluded that instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  4. The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. We are all motivated by many different things. It is influenced by our past, present and the future. Motivation is the light for learning. Motivation is what moves us to do actions: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri & Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia, as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s (1972) theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is Widely accepted and Studied ( Jehdo , 2009) . According to Choosri & Intharaksa ( 2011 ) integrative motivation Refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps up to become valued members of similar that the second language community . And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours . It further Represents an interchange between self-concept , attitudes , and motivation . In other words , integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture ( Garcia , 2007)

    Instrumental motivation Refers to a desire to Achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals ; for example , passing an examination , or furthering career opportunities ( Choosri & Intharaksa , 2011) . Garcia (2007 ) said that the instrumental orientation Allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language . Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one ‘s education . Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in the general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary . Instrumentally motivated learners are less Likely to succeed in communication Compared with integratively motivated learners who growing niche to be more successful in the aural – oral proficiency . Then , According Holt , ( as cited by Hudson , 2001), instrumental motivation is Generally Characterized by the desire to Obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language . With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian , such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation , applying for a job , requesting higher pay based on language ability , reading technical material , translation work or Achieving higher social status . Often instrumental motivation is characteristic of second language acquisition , where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the language targets takes place , or in some instances is even Desired . It could be conclude that instrumental motivation Refers to a desire to Achieve or get some practical purpose , such as futures studies , career , and score .

  5. Name : Guntur Adventius Willem
    SIN : 1112150021

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolve around intentionally. It is influenced by our past, present and the future. It is what moves us to act. Chossri and Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation is the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act and gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia (as cited in Gardner and Lambert, 1972) said that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri and Intharaksa (2011) integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of the second language community. It is the ability to relate to the language of a different community. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integrative motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning of a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture, and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, it refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination or furthering career opportunities (Choosri and Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language, such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According to Holt, (as cited by Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work, and achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  6. Name : Damayanty Hotmauli
    SIN : 1112150023

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolve around intentionally. It is the light for learning; what moves us to action, why we start, go on with or stop an activity, giving a motivation to do something, internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need, the response we make to challenge and threat in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri & Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia, as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s (1972) theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientations or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and are widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri & Intharaksa (2011) integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps become similar valued members of the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability related to the different language of yours with a community. It further represents an interchange among self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integrative motivation learners is mainly interested to the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language, such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Generally, instrumental motivation learners is concerned to language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumental motivation learners is less succeed in communication when compared with integrative motivation learners who tends to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. Then, according to Holt, (as cited by Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher payment based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic a second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner in a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be concluded that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  7. Mikha Nauli
    1112150031/BS-B

    The Nature of Motivation
    Motivation is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri & Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia, (as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s, 1972) theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). Choosri and Intharaksa (2011) stated integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And it is also the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According Holt, (as cited by Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  8. Merita Christiana
    1112150032 / FKIP BS-B

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. It is the light for learning. It moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri and Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia (as cited in Gardner and Lamberts, 1972) studied that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri & Intharaksa (2011) integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integrative motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.
    Instrumental motivation refers to desire the achievement proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri and Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integrative motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According Holt (as cited by Hudson, 2001), instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  9. Name: Serly Novita
    SNR: 1112150008

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. It is the light for learning and what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri & Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia, as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s (1972) theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri & Intharaksa (2011) integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. Integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that most successful students when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language, such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According Holt, (as cited by Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. It is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  10. Name : Tuti Haryati Sihite
    Nim : 1112150044

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation influenced by our past, present and the future. Motivation is the light for learning. Motivation is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri and Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia (as cited in Gardner and Lamberts’ , 1972) theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.
    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri and Intharaksa (2011) integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.
    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According to Holt, (as cited by Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  11. Name : Cianly Sriwisesa

    SIN : 1112150047

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. We are all motivated by many different things. It is the light for learning and what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri and Intharaksa, (2011) stated motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia, (as cited in Gardner and Lamberts, 1972) theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). Choosri and Intharaksa (2011) stated integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri and Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According Holt (as cited by Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  12. Name : Gladys Yusiva Doane
    Class : B
    1112150046

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. Motivation is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri and Intharaksa (2011,p.4) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals. Garcia, (as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s ,1972, p.30) theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations. Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and are widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). Choosri and Intharaksa (2011) stated that integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integrative motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning. A target language is these who the people like speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal and score in the target community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language, such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integrative motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According to Holt (as cited by Hudson, 2001), instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career and score.

  13. Rahelia Eta .S
    (1112150033)
    BS – B

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. Motivation is the light for learning, and it is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri & Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia, (as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s,1972) stated theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri & Intharaksa (2011), integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) stated that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language, such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According Holt, (as cited by Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  14. Name : Dewi Natalia Perangin-angin
    SIN : 1112150042

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. We are all motivated by many different things. It is influenced by our past. Motivation is the light for learning. Motivation is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need. The marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri and Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia (as cited in Gardner and Lamberts, 1972) theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri and Intharaksa (2011) integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integrative motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri and Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integrative motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According Holt (as cited by Hudson, 2001), instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  15. Naomi Anitasari Banjarnahor
    1112150034 / FKIP BS-B

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. It is the light for learning. It moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri and Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia (as cited in Gardner and Lamberts, 1972) studied that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri and Intharaksa (2011), integrative motivation refers to a desire to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to desire the achievement proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri and Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integrative motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According Holt (as cited by Hudson, 2001), instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  16. Name : Lamtiur Tampubolon
    SIN : 1112150017
    BS A

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. Motivation is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri & Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia (as cited in Gardner and Lamberts, 1972) depicted that research has been reduce to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri and Intharaksa (2011), integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It is further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. Besides, integrative motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to desire the achievement proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri and Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integrative motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According Holt (as cited by Hudson, 2001), instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  17. Name : Ribka Nasita Putri
    Class : A
    1112150002

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolve around intentionally. It is the light for learning what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri and Intharaksa (2011,p.4) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals. Garcia, (as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s ,1972, p.30) theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations. Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and are widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). Choosri and Intharaksa (2011) stated that integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning. A target language is these who the people like speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal and score in the target community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language, such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According to Holt (as cited by Hudson, 2001), instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career and score.

  18. Nama : Mega Intan Sari
    Nim : 1112150012
    Class : A

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. We are all motivated by many different things. It is influenced by our past, present and the future. Motivation is the light for learning and what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri & Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia, as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s (1972) theory that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is Widely accepted and Studied ( Jehdo , 2009) . Choosri & Intharaksa ( 2011 ) integrative motivation Refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps up to become valued members of similar that the second language community . And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours . It further Represents an interchange between self-concept , attitudes , and motivation . In other words , integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture ( Garcia , 2007). It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. Then, Holt, (as cited by Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  19. Name : Rentha jullindah zend
    111 21 500 06
    BS A

    The Nature of Motivation

    Could be better is all the motivation behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally . We are all motivated by many different things. It is influenced by our past, present and the future . Motivation is the light for learning . Motivation is what moves us to action : why we start , go on with or stop an activity ; giving a motive to do something ; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need ; the response we make to the challenges and threats in Situations where success or failure is possible , the marshaling or enthusiasm , confidence and persistence . Chossri & Intharaksa ( 2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to Achieve the goal of learning the language the which leads to a conscious decision to act , and gives rise roomates to a period of sustained intellectual and / or physical effort in order to ATTAIN previous set of goals ( p.4 ) . Garcia , as cited in Gardner and Lambert ‘s ( 1972) theory of research that has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or could be better for studying the language items, namely integrative and instrumental orientations ( p.30 ) . Thus , students ‘ motivation Refers to their desire to Achieve goals with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations .

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is Widely accepted and Studied ( Jehdo , 2009) . According to Choosri & Intharaksa ( 2011 ) integrative motivation Refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps up to become valued members of similar that the second language community . And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours . It further Represents an interchange between self-concept , attitudes , and motivation . In other words , integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture ( Garcia , 2007)

    Instrumental motivation Refers to a desire to Achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals ; for example , passing an examination , or furthering career opportunities ( Choosri & Intharaksa , 2011) . Garcia (2007 ) said that the instrumental orientation Allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language . Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one ‘s education . Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in the general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary . Instrumentally motivated learners are less Likely to succeed in communication Compared with integratively motivated learners who growing niche to be more successful in the aural – oral proficiency . Then , According Holt , ( as cited by Hudson , 2001), instrumental motivation is Generally Characterized by the desire to Obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language . With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian , such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation , applying for a job , requesting higher pay based on language ability , reading technical material , translation work or Achieving higher social status . Often instrumental motivation is characteristic of second language acquisition , where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the language targets takes place , or in some instances is even Desired . It could be conclude that instrumental motivation Refers to a desire to Achieve or get some practical purpose , such as futures studies , career , and score .

  20. Name : Mei Pangaribuan
    SIN :11 12 15 00 15
    Class : BS A

    Good afternoon sir, here I send my assignment. Thank you.

    Be Nature Motivation

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolve around intentionally. It is the light for learning and what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri and Intharaksa (2011, p.4) accentuated motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals. Garcia, (as cited in Gardner & Lambert, 1972, p. 30) stated that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations. Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations. Motivation is the light for learning.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri and Intharaksa (2011), integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integrative motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) stated that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language, such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integrative motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. Then, according to Holt (as cited in Hudson, 2001), instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purposes, such as future study, career, and score.

  21. YULIA LESTARI TARIHORAN
    1112150041
    BS-B

    REVISED

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. Motivation is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri & Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia (as cited in Gardner and Lamberts, 1972) depicted that research has been reduce to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri and Intharaksa (2011), integrative motivation refers to a desire to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri and Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According Holt (as cited by Hudson, 2001), instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  22. Name : Melva Melisa Tambunan
    S.I.N : 11. 121. 500. 16
    FKIP BS – A (2011)

    Be Nature Motivation

    We are all motivated by many different things, by our past, present and the future. Motivation is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri and Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia (as cited in Gardner and Lamberts, 1972) studied that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri and Intharaksa (2011), integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It is further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. Besides, integrative motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri and Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integrative motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According Holt (as cited by Hudson, 2001), instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  23. Erika Magdalena Septiana
    1112150901
    FKIP BS- B

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is all the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. It is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri and Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p. 4). Garcia, (as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s, 1972) argued that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). Choosri and Intharaksa’s (2011) integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integratively motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integratively motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. Then, Holt, (as cited in Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

    thank you sir 🙂

  24. Jessica Talentia
    11 121 500 39

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is the reasons behind why we behave as we do and revolves around intentionally. It is the light for learning and what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri and Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia (as cited in Gardner and Lamberts, 1972) studied that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation shows obvious goals of learners in language learning and it is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri and Intharaksa (2011), integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It is further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. Besides, integrative motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning in a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to desire the achievement proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri and Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education. Instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integrative motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According Holt (as cited by Hudson, 2001), instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

  25. Name : Debora Evina Banjarnahor
    NIM : 1112150004
    Class : BS-A

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri and Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia, (as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s, 1972) stated that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). Choosri and Intharaksa (2011) integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integrative motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integrative motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. Holt, (as cited by Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

    Thanks Sir

  26. Hardianti A. Tyas
    11 121 500 49
    BS-B

    The Nature of Motivation

    Motivation is what moves us to action: why we start, go on with or stop an activity; giving a motive to do something; internal processes and external incentives that spur us to satisfy a need; the response we make to challenges and threats in situations where success or failure is possible, the marshaling or enthusiasm, confidence and persistence. Chossri & Intharaksa (2011) accentuated that motivation means the combination of effort plus desire to achieve the goal of learning the language which leads to a conscious decision to act, and which gives rise to a period of sustained intellectual and/or physical effort in order to attain previous set goals (p.4). Garcia, (as cited in Gardner and Lambert’s, 1972) stated that research has been reduced to the identification of two motivational orientation or reasons for studying the language, namely integrative and instrumental orientations (p.30). Thus, students’ motivation refers to their desire to achieve goal with two motivational orientations such as integrative and instrumental orientations.

    Integrative and instrumental motivation show obvious goals of learners in language learning and is widely accepted and studied (Jehdo, 2009). According to Choosri & Intharaksa (2011) integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language in order to have contact with and perhaps to become similar valued members of that the second language community. And integrative orientation is the ability to relate to the language of a community different than yours. It further represents an interchange between self-concept, attitudes, and motivation. In other words, integrative motivated learners are mainly interested in the second language community and its culture (Garcia, 2007). Then, motivation has also been identified as the learner’s orientation with regard to the goal of learning a second language. It is thought that students who are most successful when learning a target language are those who like the people that speak the language, admire the culture and have a desire to become familiar with or even integrate into the society in which the language is used. Therefore, integrative motivation refers to a desire to learn the second language with the goal for target community and score in the community.

    Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve proficiency in a new language for some practical goals; for example, passing an examination, or furthering career opportunities (Choosri & Intharaksa, 2011). Garcia (2007) said that instrumental orientation allows the learner to gain something from acquiring the language. Such as in the case of acquiring a job or enhancing one’s education, instrumentally motivated learners are concerned with success in general language skills such as grammar and vocabulary. Instrumentally motivated learners are less likely to succeed in communication compared with integrative motivated learners who tend to be more successful in aural-oral proficiency. According to Holt, (as cited by Hudson, 2001) instrumental motivation is generally characterized by the desire to obtain something practical or concrete from the study of a second language. With instrumental motivation the purpose of language acquisition is more utilitarian, such as meeting the requirements for school or university graduation, applying for a job, requesting higher pay based on language ability, reading technical material, translation work or achieving higher social status. Instrumental motivation is often characteristic of second language acquisition, where little or no social integration of the learner into a community using the target language takes place, or in some instances is even desired. It could be conclude that Instrumental motivation refers to a desire to achieve or get some practical purpose, such as future study, career, and score.

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