Scientific Articles Structure


Scientific Articles Structure

This slide presents the nature and structure of scientific articles. It focuses on the discussion on the AIMReDCar (Abstract, Introduction, Methodology, Results, Discussion, and References) sections.

Feel free to access and download the slide from here

The complete paper on which this slide was made could be downloaded from here

Exercise 2

After studying complete paper and the slide, please read Sri Darma Siahaan’s (2012) Using Story Reading Technique to Improve EFL Young Learners’ Vocabulary (to get the full paper, click the Full Text: PDF) and identify whether the article includes each of the elements of every section covered in the AIMReDCar structure.  If the article does not include the element, mark (Excluded). If it contains it mark with (Included) and state it briefly and tell on what page it is written. Write using the following template. Abstract Section is done as a sample. Proceed to do the same to Introduction, Methodology, Results, Discussion, Conclusion, and References sections.

Good luck!

 Abstract Section

  1. Objective: (Included)– to improve young leaners’English vocabulary (p. 207)
  2. Subjects (Material): (Included)–to improve young learners’ English vocabulary (p. 207)
  3. Methodology: (Included)–mixed method (collecting and analyzing quantitative and qualitative data) (p. 207)
  4. Results: (Included)–story reading techniques improved the participants’ vocabulary mastery and the use of stories significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery.(p. 207)
  5. Conclusion: (Included)–the use of story reading technique was effective to improve kindergarten students’ vocabulary mastery. (p. 207)
  6. Keywords: (Included)–story reading, vocabulary, young learner, kindergarten.. (p. 207)

Introduction Section

  1. Problem & its background:
  2. Specific problem to be studied;
  3. Reasons of importance to study:
  4. Hypothesis:
  5. Objectives:
  6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms:

Methodology Section

  1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care
  2. Sample preparation techniques;
  3. Origins of samples and materials;
  4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data;
  5. Statistical analysis techniques
  6. Information on computer programs used
  7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function.

Results Section

  1. General statements presenting the key results (data)
  2. charts and tables that present the data.
  3. statistical analyses

 Discussion Section

Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section

Conclusion Section

  1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings;
  2. general implications of the study;
  3. suggestions for further research.

References Section

  1. How many sources are listed?
  2. Does it include cited sources only?

Deadline for posting answer: Saturday, March 22, 2014, 12:00 pm.

34 Comments

  1. Introduction section
    1.Problem and its background: (Included)
    Problem: the problem is the students face their lack of vocabulary teaching.
    Background : The background of the problem is teaching English to young learners, including in kindergarten, now is a common phenomenon in most big cities in Indonesia. (p.208)
    2.Specific problem to be studied: (Included)
    Does the use of reading stories technique can affect or improve the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery? (p. 209)
    3.Reasons of importance to study: (Included)
    A teaching-learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary, because it will make the learning process not run well and reading stories is one of the most effective ways that teachers can use to improve young leaners’ English (pp. 208-209)
    4.Hypothesis: (Included)
    If the teacher use the reading stories technique, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p.209)
    5.Statistical analysis techniques: (Included)
    The quantitative data was analyzed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211)
    The qualitative data was analyzed by descriptive analysis technique. (p. 211)
    6.Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included)
    That is why teaching vocabulary is very important because the students’ language is related to the mastery of their vocabulary that will affect the quality and quantity of their language. Thus, improving and teaching vocabulary needs to have more attention since earlier stage (kindergarten) (p. 210)

    Methodology section

    1.Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care: (Included)
    This study is a three- cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)
    2.Sample preparation techniques : (Included)
    The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher. (p.211)
    3.Origins of samples and materials : (Included) – The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)
    4.Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data : (Included)
    The test was used to collect the quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. The test was carried out four times; pre-test, post-test I, post-test II, post-test III. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211) The non-test was used to collect the qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. The non-test was carried out using observation sheet, documentation, and interview guides. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p. 211)

    Resuslt section
    1.General statements presenting the key results (data): (Included)
    All three paired -samples t- tests above disclose that the use of story
    reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in
    each cycle. Therefore, the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is
    used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted
    2.Charts and tables that present the data: (Included)
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score

    3.Statistical analyses: (included)
    Table 11 above reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I.
    Table 12 above reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and
    post-test I.
    Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and
    post-test II. (p.219-220)

    Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section:
    The action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.
    Conclusion Section
    1.a succinct summary of implications of the findings : Included
    The results of posttests conducted at the end of every cycle indicates that using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p.221)
    2.general implications of the study: Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p. 221)
    3.suggestions for further research: Kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an good alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. (p. 221)

    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed?
    There are fourteen (14) sources listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only?
    Yes, it does.

    1. Name : Tuti Haryati Sihite
      nim : 1112150044

      Introduction section
      1.Problem and its background: (Included)
      Problem: the problem is the students face their lack of vocabulary teaching.
      Background : The background of the problem is teaching English to young learners, including in kindergarten, now is a common phenomenon in most big cities in Indonesia. (p.208)
      2.Specific problem to be studied: (Included)
      Does the use of reading stories technique can affect or improve the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery? (p. 209)
      3.Reasons of importance to study: (Included)
      A teaching-learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary, because it will make the learning process not run well and reading stories is one of the most effective ways that teachers can use to improve young leaners’ English (pp. 208-209)
      4.Hypothesis: (Included)
      If the teacher use the reading stories technique, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p.209)
      5.Statistical analysis techniques: (Included)
      The quantitative data was analyzed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211)
      The qualitative data was analyzed by descriptive analysis technique. (p. 211)
      6.Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included)
      That is why teaching vocabulary is very important because the students’ language is related to the mastery of their vocabulary that will affect the quality and quantity of their language. Thus, improving and teaching vocabulary needs to have more attention since earlier stage (kindergarten) (p. 210)

      Methodology section

      1.Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care: (Included)
      This study is a three- cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)
      2.Sample preparation techniques : (Included)
      The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher. (p.211)
      3.Origins of samples and materials : (Included) – The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)
      4.Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data : (Included)
      The test was used to collect the quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. The test was carried out four times; pre-test, post-test I, post-test II, post-test III. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211) The non-test was used to collect the qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. The non-test was carried out using observation sheet, documentation, and interview guides. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p. 211)

      Resuslt section
      1.General statements presenting the key results (data): (Included)
      All three paired -samples t- tests above disclose that the use of story
      reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in
      each cycle. Therefore, the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is
      used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted
      2.Charts and tables that present the data: (Included)
      Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
      Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
      Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
      Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
      Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
      Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
      Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
      Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
      Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
      Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
      Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
      Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
      Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
      Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score

      3.Statistical analyses: (included)
      Table 11 above reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig.
      (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
      of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we
      can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I.
      Table 12 above reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig.
      (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
      of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we
      can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and
      post-test I.
      Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig.
      (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
      of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we
      can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and
      post-test II. (p.219-220)

      Discussion Section
      Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section:
      The action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.
      Conclusion Section
      1.a succinct summary of implications of the findings : Included
      The results of posttests conducted at the end of every cycle indicates that using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p.221)
      2.general implications of the study: Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p. 221)
      3.suggestions for further research: Kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an good alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. (p. 221)

      References Section
      1. How many sources are listed?
      There are fourteen (14) sources listed.
      2. Does it include cited sources only?
      Yes, it does.

  2. Hello all,
    I appreciate your trial to finish this exercise as good as possible. Most of of managed to answer some points quite well. However, some other answers are not quite acceptable. Let’s see some samples.

    1. Problem & its background:
    A research problem (or ‘phenomenon’) is the topic to be addressed, investigated, or studied.
    In “Using Story Reading Technique to Improve EFL Young Learners’ Vocabulary”, the problem is “the kindergarten students’ poor vocabulary”

    Background is the information is used to indicate the root of the problem being studied, its scope, and the extent to which previous studies have successfully investigated the problem. In Siahaan’s article, the background is that although vocabulary teaching has the most diverse techniques, and one of the most effective is reading stories, most kindergarten students are not taught using these technique.

    2. Specific problem to be studied (the research question, i.e. the specific question or part of the solution the researcher is working on or going to gather research on).
    In Siahaan’s article, the specific problem is: (1) How does the use of reading story technique affect the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary learning? (2) Does the use of reading stories technique improve the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery?

    3. Reasons of importance to study:
    To show whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary and how it is done.

    The second comment of mine to most of you, please be careful with your expressions. Make sure that your sentences, clauses, or phrases is effective and grammatical.

  3. Name : Debora Evina Banjarnahor
    Nim : 1112150004
    Class : BS A

    Introduction section

    Issues and background : ( Included)
    Problem : The biggest problem occurring phenomenon that often lack the vocabulary mastery of the students in the use of language is based on the observations of researchers ( p.208 )
    Background : a common phenomenon that bilingual education ( using Indonesian and English as the medium of teaching and learning ) continues to grow in Indonesia as well as in young learners and kindergarten . ( P. 208 )

    2. Special problems which must be learned; (Included)
    Students lose their focus and motivation, ability to express what they want to communicate, and find it difficult to master the English language as if the student does not know the meaning of many words that they hear in conversation or meeting in the text, their understanding is likely to be compromised. (P.208)

    3. An important reason for studying: (Included)
    Vocabulary learning must be made fun and meaningful for students. To improve students vocabulary mastery ‘which should be the first priority. (P.208)

    4. Hypothesis: (Included)
    If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade
    students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase.( P.209)

    5 . Objectives : ( Included)
    The effectiveness of reading stories to develop young learners vocabulary , researchers wanted to see if the story read as complementary techniques of teaching activity significantly increases its K – 1 students vocabulary EFL classroom . ( P.209 )

    6 .Summary of previous studies relevant operational definition of the term : (Included)
    The effectiveness of the use of reading stories to develop children’s vocabulary depends on active engagement in reading that is supported by both parents and children ( Shed and Duke , 2008) . ( P. 210 )

    Methodology section
    1 . Subject ( humans , animals , plants ) and handling the pre – test them and care :
    This study is a three – cycling action performed within two months ( May-June 2012) at Mercy Children’s Preschool , Kelapa Gading , Jakarta . ( P.211 )
    2 . Sample preparation techniques ;
    K – 10 students I taught by the researcher . ( P.211 )
    3 . Origins samples and materials ;
    The data was collected using test instruments and non – test . ( P.211 )
    4 . Description of the field site , including physical characteristics and biological , and procedures appropriate location to collect data ;
    Mechanical tests are used to collect quantitative data derived from participants
    vocabulary achievement . Techniques Non – tests used to collect qualitative data , including : observation , documentation , and interviews . ( P.211 )
    5 . Statistical analysis techniques :
    Testing is done four times , the pre – test , post- test I, post test II , III and post test . The techniques of non -test performed using observation sheets , documentation and interview guides . To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests , t – tests were employed using SPSS version 17 . To analyze the qualitative data , using descriptive analysis techniques . ( P.211 )
    6 . Information about the computer programs used :
    To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests , t – tests were employed using SPSS version 17 . ( P.211 )
    7 . Description of the equipment set-up and functions :
    To ensure the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study , methodological , theoretical , and time employed triangulations . Methodological triangulation is given by using more than one method of data collection , namely observation , interviews , and tests . Theory triangulation is done by using more than one theoretical scheme in the interpretation of the phenomenon. Time triangulation performed by
    collect data in different times ( three cycles ) and from a variety of sources ( students , observers , and test ) .
    section
    1 . General statements present the results of a key (data )
    Third pair – sample t – test above reveals that the use of story readingtechnique significantly improve students’ vocabulary mastery at each cycle . ( P. 220 )
    2 .Graphs and tables that present data .
    They are thirteen table and a graph .
    Table 1 : Participants Pre – Test Score Table 2 : Results of Observation Cycle I Table 3 : Results of Cycle Interviews I Table 4 : Participants ‘ Post – Test Scores of the first cycle
    Table 5 : Observations Cycle II Table 6 : Results of Cycle II Interview
    Table 7 : Participants ‘ Post – Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8 : Observations Cycle III
    Table 9 : Results of Cycle III Interview
    Table 10 : Participants ‘ Post – Test Scores of Cycle III Table 11 : Results of t – test of Pre – Test and Post – Test I
    Table 12 : Results of t – test of the Post – Test Post- Test I and II Table 13 : Results of t – test of Pre – Test and Post – Test I Figure 1 : Test Participants ‘ Mean Score
    3 . Statistical analysis
    Table 11 above shows that t – count was 3,873 with a significant sig . ( 2 – tailed ) 0.004 . While the t – table with a significant level of 0.05 and degrees of freedom ( df ) = n – 1 = 9 is 2.262 . Because t – count ( 3.873 ) > t – table ( 2.262 ) , we can say there is a significant difference between the pre – test and post – test I. Table 12 above shows that t – count was 9,000 with a significant sig . ( 2 – tailed ) 0.000 . While the t – table with a significant level of 0.05 and degrees
    freedom ( df ) = n – 1 = 9 is 2.262 . Because t – count ( 9,000 ) > t – table ( 2.262 ) , we can say there is a significant difference between the post-test scores and post-test I I.Table 13 above shows that t – count was 3,674 with a significant sig . ( 2 – tailed ) 0.005 . While the t – table with a significant level of 0.05 and degrees of freedom ( df ) = n – 1 = 9 is 2.262 . Because t – count ( 3.674 ) > t – table ( 2.262 ) , we can say there is a significant difference between the post-test scores and post-test II II . ( P. 219 )

    Section discussion
    Presentation and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section ( Included)
    The continuous improvement of student achievement ‘ is clearly illustrated by Figure I These findings are consistent with the results of three couples – sample t – test hypotheses action “if the technique is used to read the story , vocabulary EFL K – 1 grade students will increase ” acceptable ( p.220 )

    Conclusion Section
    1 . A brief summary of the implications of the findings ( Included)
    How to effectively use reading stories to enhance the vocabulary of children ( p.221 )
    2 . The implications of this study ( Included)
    Along with improving classroom management , attention to every individual , performance in reading the story , the enthusiasm and involvement of students continues to increase from cycle to cycle . ( P. 221 )
    3 . Suggestions for further research ( Included)
    EFL kindergarten teacher recommended for use as an alternative technique of reading a story favorable to increase the vocabulary development of young students ( P.221 )
    Reference Section
    1 . How many sources are listed ? There are fourteen sources listed .
    2 . Does it include only the sources cited ? Yes , it does .

    Many Thanks Sir

  4. Name : Merita Christiana
    SIN : 1112150032
    Class B

    Introduction Section

    1. Problem & its background: (Included)
    Problem : The biggest problem is the students face their lack of vocabulary based on the researcher’s observation .Teaching English to young learners, including in kindergarten. Although the practice was under serious attacks, bilingual education (using Indonesian and English as the medium of teaching and learning) keeps on flourishing in Indonesia (p. 208)
    2. Specific problem to be studied; (Included)
    They lose their focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master, This is natural because vocabulary is very essential for comprehension and communication. If students do not know the meaning of many of the words that they listen to in a conversation or encounter in a text, their comprehension is likely to be compromised (p. 208)
    3. Reasons of importance to study: (Included)
    To increase the learners’ vocabulary mastery should be made the first priority. (p.208)
    4. Hypothesis: (Included)
    If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase (p.209)
    5. Objectives: (Included)
    The researcher in this current study would like to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary (p.209)
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included)
    Many studies on the use of story reading to develop learners’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading aloud positively affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005). (p.211)

    Methodology Section
    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care
    (Included). This study is a three cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)
    2. Sample preparation techniques;
    (Included). The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the
    researcher. (p.211)
    3. Origins of samples and materials;
    (Included). The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data;
    (Included). The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non test techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p.211)
    5. Statistical analysis techniques : (Included)
    – The quantitative data was analyzed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211)
    – The qualitative data was analyzed by descriptive analysis technique. (p. 211)
    6. Information on computer programs used : (Included)
    The t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function : (Included)
    To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. (p.211)

    Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data) (included):
    the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is
    used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (p.220)
    2. Charts and tables that present the data (included);
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores (p.212)
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I (p.213)
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I (p.214)
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I (p.214)
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II (p.215)
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II (p.216)
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II (p.216)
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III (p.217)
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III 9(p.218)
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III (p.218)
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I (p.219)
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and Post Test II (p.219)
    Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (p.221)
    3. Statistical analyses (included):
    Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test II. (p.220)

    Conclusion Section
    1. A succinct summary of implications of the findings; (Included)
    The using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p. 221)
    2. General implications of the study; (Included)
    Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p. 221)
    3. Suggestions for further research. (Included)
    Kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. (p.221)

    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed? There are 14 (fourteen) sources listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does.

  5. Nama : Belinda Montoya
    SRN : 111-21-500-48

    Introduction Section

    1. Problem & its background: (included) Based on the researcher’s observation, the biggest problem the students face is their lack of vocabulary. This often causes them to lose focus and motivation, they unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master (p.208)
    2. Specific problem to be studied: (included) Vocabulary is very essential for comprehension and communication. If students do not know the meaning of many of the words that they listen to in a conversation or encounter in a text, their comprehension is likely to be compromised (p.208)
    3. Reasons of importance to study: (included) The growth of vocabulary knowledge is an essential prerequisite for language acquisition, because a teaching-learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary (p.208)
    4. Hypothesis: (included) If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p. 209)
    5. Objectives: (included) The effectiveness of reading stories to develop young learners’
    vocabulary,and improve K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary. (p. 209)
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (included) Many studies on the use of story reading to develop learners’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading aloud positively affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005) (p.211)

    Methodology Section

    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care : (included) The 10 K-I students in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta (p.211)
    2. Sample preparation techniques: (included) The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement (p.211)
    3. Origins of samples and materials : (included) The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data : (included)
    5. Statistical analysis techniques : (included) the test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non test techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed (p.211)
    6. Information on computer programs used : (included) To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17 (p.211)
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function : (included)

    Results Section

    1. General statements presenting the key results (data) : (included) All three paired-samples t-tests above disclose that the use of story readingtechnique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle (p.220)
    2. charts and tables that present the data :
    • Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    • Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    • Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    • Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    • Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    • Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    • Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    • Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    • Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    • Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    • Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    • Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    • Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    • Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (p. 212-221)
    3. statistical analyses : (included)
    -Table 11, the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of pre-test and post-test I. Specifically, this result suggests that when students are taught vocabularies using story reading technique, their achievement increases. (p. 219)
    -Table 12, the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test II. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 219)
    -Table 13, t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and Post-test III. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 220)

    Discussion Section

    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section : (Included)
    – (Cycle I) Only 40% of them loved learning vocabulary using stories.
    – (Cycle II) 60% of the students had been interested to learn vocabulary using stories, 20% managed to understand the story though they faced strange words, and 80% had realized their vocabulary mastery increased after listening to the stories. Only 20% of the students got “good” score, and 20% still got the scores below the minimum passing standard. The majority of students began to be active in asking questions or doing the worksheets.
    – (Cycle III) The students were now interested to learn vocabulary using stories, 60% managed to understand the story though they faced strange words, and 100% had realized their vocabulary mastery increased after listening to the stories. 60% had got “good” score, and no more students got the scores below the minimum passing standard. The students’ activeness was even higher.
    The action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (pp. 220-221)
    Conclusion Section

    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings: (included) The using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p. 221)
    2. general implications of the study: (Included) Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle (p. 221)
    3. suggestions for further research: (Included)
    kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development (p. 221)

    References Section

    1. How many sources are listed? There are 14 sources are listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it did.

  6. Name : Meilynda Mora. S
    SIN : 1112150027
    Class : (BS) A

    Introduction Section
    1. Problem and Background (Included)
    The Problem is: Students lacking in understanding vocabulary, as well as kindergarten, that makes them less focused and less motivated, so they couldn’t communicate well because of lack of understanding the English language. (P. 208).
    The Background is: It has become a common phenomenon in Indonesia, should fast and responsive students in mastering English vocabulary. (P. 208).
    2. Specific problem to be studied (Included)
    Students’ lack of focus and motivation, so it is not able to communicate well expressed. Because, lacking the understanding in mastering the English language. (P. 208).
    3. Reasons of importance of study (Included)
    Students must understand the vocabulary well, because it is very important for learning English. And a good vocabulary can also facilitate students in the structure of the conversation. (P.208)
    4. Hypothesis (Included)
    If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (P.209)
    5. Objectives (Included)
    We can see whether the technique of reading the story as a complementary teaching activities significantly increase its K-1 students’ vocabulary EFL classroom. (P.209)
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms (Included)
    Teaching vocabulary itself is also the most important because of the language related to student mastery of vocabulary that will affect the quality and quantity of language. Thus, improving and teaching vocabulary needs to have more attention from the very beginning from TK. (P. 210)
    Methodology Section
    1. Subjects and their pre-experiment handling and care (Included)
    This study is a three cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012). (P.211)
    2. Sample preparation techniques, there are two techniques in the data (Included)
    Mechanical engineering tests and non-test, non-test techniques used to collect qualitative data while the test techniques used to collect quantitative data of students. (P.211)
    3. Origins of samples and materials (Included)
    The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (P.211)
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data (Included)
    The test was used to collect the quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. The test was carried out four times; pre-test, post-test I, post-test II, post-test III. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using spss. (P. 211)
    5. Statistical analysis techniques (included)
    To analyze the quantitative data can be uses from the tests (included) the test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. (P.211)
    6. Information on computer programs used (included)
    Using spss version 17 from media Microsoft Office. (P.211)
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function (Included)
    To ensure the validity of the qualitative data obtained in the study of theoretical, methodological, and time employed triangulations. (P.211)

    Result Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results data (Included)
    Because three couples-sample t-tests revealed that the use of story reading techniques significantly improves the students’ vocabulary mastery at each cycle there. So, can assist students in understanding conversational English (P.220)
    2. Charts and tables that present the data (Included)
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and Post Test II
    Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and Post Test III
    The Participants’ Tests Mean Score from (PP. 211-222)
    3. Statistical analyses (Included)
    Table of 11: the t count is 3.873 with the significant sig: “2 tailed” 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of pre-test and post-test I. Specifically, this result suggests that when students are taught vocabularies using story reading technique, their achievement increases. (p. 219)
    Table of 12: the t count is 9.000 with the significant sig. “2 tailed” 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test II. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 219)
    Table of 13: t count is 3.674 with the significant. “2 tailed” 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and Post-test III. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement. (P. 220)
    4. Discussion Section (Included)
    Cycle 1 = 40 % of them love to learn vocabulary using stories.
    Cycle 2 = 60 % of students have been interested in learning vocabulary by using stories , 20 % managed to understand the story even though they face the strange words , and 80 % have increased their vocabulary realized after listening to the stories .
    And only 20 % of students got a good score , and 20 % still had values below the minimum graduation standards . Most of the students became active in asking questions or doing worksheets.
    Cycle 3 = The students are now interested to learn vocabulary using stories , 60 % managed to understand the story even though they face the strange words , and 100 % aware of their increased vocabulary after listening to the stories . 60 % had received a good value, and no students scored below the minimum graduation standards. Student activity even higher.
    Hypothesis = “If the technique is used to read the story, vocabulary EFL students K – 1st grade can be increase. (PP.220-221)

    Conclusion Section
    1. A brief summary of the implications of the findings (Included)
    How to effectively use reading stories to enhance the vocabulary of children (P.221)
    2. The implications of this study (Included)
    if the improvement in classroom management with attention to every individual, performance in reading the story, the desire and willingness to continue to increase student learning of the cycle. (P.221)
    3. Suggestions for further research (Included)
    EFL kindergarten teacher and students are encouraged to use the technique of reading the story as a favorable alternative to improve students’ vocabulary development, so that students can quickly grasp the vocabulary of the English language very well. (P.221)

    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed? There are 14 names sources.
    2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does.

    Thank you Sir, God Bless

  7. Good Night Sir, ^__^
    Shalom,,

    Name : Vhanny Rumondang
    Nim: 1112150029
    Class : A

    A. Introduction Section :
    1. Problem and its background : The main problem students is vocabulary. Because, every student lack of vocabulary will cause them to lose motivation in learning focus.
    Students who lack vocabulary can not express with perfect communication and learning difficult to master the English language.
    This problem is often found on a student or a student in college.
    2. Specific problem to be studied : Students who do not understand the vocabulary, can not understand a text in reading comprehension and spoken communication well in English.
    3. Reasons of importance to study : Students to expand vocabulary students need to understand the meaning of a vocabulary, because this is a priority for students learning English.
    4. Hypothesis : If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p.209).
    5. Objectives : a student in reading English text will develop vocabulary, because the researchers looked at whether the English text a student can understand. It also complements the teaching activity is significantly to improve vocabulary EFL classes K – 1 students. (P.209).
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: several studies in the use of story reading to increase students’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading is positively to affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005). (p.211).

    B. Methodology Section
    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care: (included): The 10 K-I students in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211).
    2. Sample preparation techniques: The participants of the research were the 10. the technique used K-I students taught by the researcher.
    3. Origins of samples and materials: (Included) – The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data: (included) The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Qualitative data were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview.
    5. Statistical analysis techniques: The quantitative data was analyzed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211). Then, qualitative data was analyzed by descriptive analysis technique. (p. 211) 6. Information on computer programs used: (included) using SPSS version 17.
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function: (included) To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed.
    C. Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data): (Included) This study about a three- cycled which is all three paired-samples t-tests disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. (p. 220).
    2. charts and tables that present the data: (Included)
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (pp. 212-221)
    3.statistical analyses: Table 11 proofs that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of pre-test and post-test I. Specifically, this result suggests that when students are taught vocabularies using story reading technique, their achievement increases. (p. 219)
    -Table 12 proofs that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test II. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 219)
    – Table 13 proofs that t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and Post-test III. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 220)
    D. Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section: These findings are consistent with the results of the three-paired samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.

    E. Conclusion Section
    2. general implications of the study: Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p. 221)
    3. suggestions for further research: Kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an good alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. (p. 221)
    F. References Section
    1. How many sources are listed? There are 14 sources are listed
    2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does.

    Ok, Thanks sir Parlin. God Bless 🙂

  8. Name: Damayanty Hotmauli
    SIN : 1112150023

    Introduction Section

    1. Problem & its background: (included) –teaching English to young learners is now a common phenomenon in most big cities in Indonesia. Although the practice was under serious attacks, bilingual education (using Indonesian and English as the medium of teaching and learning) keeps on flourishing in Indonesia (Sugiharto, 2006). (p.208)

    2. Specific problem to be studied; (included) –the biggest problem the students face is their lack of vocabulary. This often causes them to lose focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master. (p.208)

    3. Reasons of importance to study: (included) –the growth of vocabulary knowledge is an essential pre-requisite for language acquisition, because a teaching-learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary, which make them unable comprehend English. (p.208)

    4. Hypothesis: (included) –the action hypothesis of this study is stated as follow: “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase.” (p.209)

    5. Objectives: (included) –the objective is realizing the effectiveness of reading stories to develop young learners’
    vocabulary, the researcher in this current study would like to see whether story
    reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve
    her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary. (p.209)

    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (included) – The effectiveness of using story reading to develop children’s vocabulary relies on active engagement in the reading by both adults and children (Shed and Duke, 2008) (p.210)

    Methodology Section

    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care: (included) –the 10 students of the Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)

    2. Sample preparation techniques; (excluded)
    3. Origins of samples and materials; (excluded)

    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data; (included) –This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher. The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. (p.211)
    Statistical analysis techniques: (included) –To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed.
    Information on computer programs used: (included) –by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)

    5. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function.: (included) –tests were carried
    out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non-test
    techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide (p.211)

    Results Section

    1. General statements presenting the key results (data): (included) Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, and performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. This increase of engagement then increased their achievement. This indicates that using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p.221)

    2. charts and tables that present the data.; (included)
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and Post Test II
    Table 13: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I

    Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (p.212-221)

    3. statistical analyses; (included)
    In table 11 reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I.
    Specifically, this result suggests that when students are taught vocabularies
    using story reading technique, their achievement increases. Then in table 12 reveals that the t-count is 9.000 > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test I. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement. Table 13 reveals that the t-count is 3.674 > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test II. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement. All three paired-samples t-tests above disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. (p.219-220)

    Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section; (included)
    These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (p.221)

    Conclusion Section
    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings;(included) –the result of post-test conducted that using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p.221)

    2. general implications of the study; (included) –Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, and performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p.221)

    3. suggestions for further research.; (included) –kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. To maximize the students’ engagement, putting Shed and Duke’s (2008) suggestions “The effectiveness of using story reading to develop children’s vocabulary relies on active engagement in the reading by both teachers and students” is highly recommended. (p.210 & p.221)

    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed? There are 14 sources listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does.

    Thank You 🙂

    1. this is the right one , Sir 🙂

      Name: Damayanty Hotmauli
      SIN : 1112150023

      Introduction Section

      1. Problem & its background: (included) –teaching English to young learners is now a common phenomenon in most big cities in Indonesia. Although the practice was under serious attacks, bilingual education (using Indonesian and English as the medium of teaching and learning) keeps on flourishing in Indonesia (Sugiharto, 2006). (p.208)

      2. Specific problem to be studied; (included) –the biggest problem the students face is their lack of vocabulary. This often causes them to lose focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master. (p.208)

      3. Reasons of importance to study: (included) –the growth of vocabulary knowledge is an essential pre-requisite for language acquisition, because a teaching-learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary, which make them unable comprehend English. (p.208)

      4. Hypothesis: (included) –the action hypothesis of this study is stated as follow: “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase.” (p.209)

      5. Objectives: (included) –the objective is realizing the effectiveness of reading stories to develop young learners’
      vocabulary, the researcher in this current study would like to see whether story
      reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve
      her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary. (p.209)

      6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (included) – The effectiveness of using story reading to develop children’s vocabulary relies on active engagement in the reading by both adults and children (Shed and Duke, 2008) (p.210)

      Methodology Section

      1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care: (included) –the 10 students of the Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)

      2. Sample preparation techniques; (excluded)

      3. Origins of samples and materials; (included) –Wasi’s (2011) experimental study on the teaching of vocabulary to the fourth grade students revealed that the use of big
      story book seemed significantly to be effective in improving students’s
      vocabulary mastery. (p.211)

      4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data; (included) –This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher. The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. (p.211)

      5. Statistical analysis techniques: (included) –To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed.

      6. Information on computer programs used: (included) –by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)

      7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function.: (included) –tests were carried
      out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non-test
      techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide (p.211)

      Results Section

      1. General statements presenting the key results (data): (included) Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, and performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. This increase of engagement then increased their achievement. This indicates that using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p.221)

      2. charts and tables that present the data.; (included)
      Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
      Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
      Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
      Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
      Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
      Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
      Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
      Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
      Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
      Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
      Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
      Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and Post Test II
      Table 13: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I

      Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (p.212-221)

      3. statistical analyses; (included)
      In table 11 reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig.
      (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
      of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we
      can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I.
      Specifically, this result suggests that when students are taught vocabularies
      using story reading technique, their achievement increases. Then in table 12 reveals that the t-count is 9.000 > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test I. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement. Table 13 reveals that the t-count is 3.674 > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test II. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement. All three paired-samples t-tests above disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. (p.219-220)

      Discussion Section

      Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section; (included)
      These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (p.221)

      Conclusion Section

      1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings;(included) –the result of post-test conducted that using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p.221)

      2. general implications of the study; (included) –Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, and performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p.221)

      3. suggestions for further research.; (included) –kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. To maximize the students’ engagement, putting Shed and Duke’s (2008) suggestions “The effectiveness of using story reading to develop children’s vocabulary relies on active engagement in the reading by both teachers and students” is highly recommended. (p.210 & p.221)

      References Section
      1. How many sources are listed? There are 14 sources listed.
      2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does.

      Thank You 🙂

  9. NAME: Thurma Mayasari
    SIN: 1112150030
    CLASS: A

    Introduction Section
    1. Problem & its background: included
    The students face is their lack of vocabulary. This often because them lose focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master.p208

    2. Specific problem to be studied; included
    Accentuated that students need to learn vocabulary because otherwise they will not be able to express and articulate themselves in a way that other students or native speakers of English can understand them.p208

    3. Reasons of importance to study: included
    The growth of vocabulary knowledge is an essential prerequisite for language acquisition, because a teaching-learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary, which makes them unable to comprehend English.p208

    4. Hypothesis: included
    The hypothesis is used reading stories technique, the k-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase.p209
    5. Objectives:
    The researcher in this current study would like to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary.p209

    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: included
    Reading stories is one of the most effective ways teachers can use to design interesting and meaningful situations to teach EFL vocabulary to young learners. This technique is motivating to young learners because they are generally eager to learn new vocabulary from short stories.

    Methodology Section

    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care
    the 10 K-I students in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. p211
    2. Sample preparation techniques; exclude

    3. Origins of samples and materials;included
    The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. p211
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data; included
    This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the Researcher. p211

    5. Statistical analysis techniques; included
    To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. p211

    6. Information on computer programs used; included
    To analyze quantitative data by using SPSS version 17. p211
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function.
    The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non-test techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the
    descriptive analysis technique was employed. p211

    Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data) Included : All three paired-samples t-tests disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. p220
    2. Charts and tables that present the data:Included
    Those are 13 tables which present: p. 212 – 220
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    And one chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score p. 221

    3. Statistical Analyses: (Included)
    -Table 11 above reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I.
    Specifically, this result suggests that when students are taught.p219

    -Table 12 above reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and
    post-test I. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching
    vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement.p219

    -Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and
    post-test II. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching
    vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement.p220

    Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section: (Included)
    Cycle I revealed that although all participants loved stories and stories with pictures, only 40% of them loved learning vocabulary using stories. Cycle II, only 20% of the students got “good” score, and 20% still got the scores below the minimum passing standard. But in the post test of Cycle III, 60% had got “good” score, and no more students got the scores below the minimum passing standard.
    These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples
    t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is
    used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is
    accepted. p220-221

    Conclusion Section; included
    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings;
    using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective.
    2. general implications of the study;
    the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. This increase of engagement then increased their achievement, as shown by the results of posttests conducted at the end of every cycle.
    3. suggestions for further research.
    Realizing its high effectiveness, kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development.

    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed?
    There are 14 sources listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only?
    Yes, it does.

    thank you sir

  10. Name : Mirna Widia Yunita
    NIM : 1112150043

    Introduction Section
    1. Problem & its background:
    Based on the researcher’s : observation, the biggest problem the students face is their lack of vocabulary.
    2. Specific problem to be studied;
    Causes them to lose focus and motivation, unable to express what
    they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master.
    3. Reasons of importance to study:
    Vocabulary is very essential for comprehension and communication. If
    students do not know the meaning of many of the words that they listen to in a
    conversation or encounter in a text, their comprehension is likely to be
    compromised
    4. Hypothesis:
    The action hypothesis of this study is stated as follow: “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase.”
    5. Objectives:
    To see them vocabulary can explore in : Reading stories can improve both EFL learners’ listening and comprehension skills; therefore, enabling them to obtain vocabulary. Ellis and Brewster (2002, p. 2)
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms:
    Reading stories can improve both EFL learners’ listening and comprehension skills; therefore, enabling them to obtain vocabulary. Ellis and Brewster (2002, p. 2)
    Methodology Section
    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care
    Action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta
    2. Sample preparation techniques;
    The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher.
    3. Origins of samples and materials;
    The data was collected using test and non-test instruments
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data;
    The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’
    vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview.

    5. Statistical analysis techniques
    Tests were carried
    out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non-test
    techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and
    interview guide. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test
    was employed by using SPSS version 17
    6. Information on computer programs used
    Using SPSS version 17
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function.
    To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)
    Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data)
    In addition to the students’ lack of vocabulary, this action research was also triggered by the fact that most of the students had low motivation and was not excited to follow the lessons
    2. charts and tables that present the data.
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score
    3. statistical analyses
    Table 11 above reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I.
    Specifically, this result suggests that when students are taught vocabularies
    using story reading technique, their achievement increases. Table 12 above reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and
    post-test I. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching
    vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement.
    Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and
    post-test II. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching
    vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement.
    Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section: Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section: (Included) – (1) In cycle I, only 40% of them loved learning vocabulary using stories. (2) In Cycle II, the majority of students began to be active in asking questions or doing the worksheets. (3) In Cycle III, the improvement even went further because the students’ activeness was even higher. The action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (pp. 220-221)
    Conclusion Section
    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings;
    This indicates that using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective.
    2. general implications of the study;
    The students should fully be engaged in open-ended questions, discussion and other relevant activities carried out after the session of listening to the stories.
    3. suggestions for further research.
    To maximize the students’ engagement, putting Shed and Duke’s (2008) suggestions is highly recommended.
    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed? There are 14 names
    2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does

  11. Name : Rahelia Eta .S
    NIM : 1112150033

    Introduction Section

    1. Problem & its background (included) (p. 208) :
    • Problem : Based on the researcher’s observation, the biggest problem the students face is their lack of vocabulary.
    • Its background : This often causes them to lose focus and motivation, they unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master.

    2. Specific problem to be studied (included) : Vocabulary is very essential for comprehension and communication. If students do not know the meaning of many of the words that they listen to in a conversation or encounter in a text, their comprehension is likely to be compromised. (p. 208)
    3. Reasons of importance to study (included) : it is obvious that to increase the
    learners’ vocabulary mastery should be made the first priority. (p. 208)
    4. Hypothesis (included) :
    If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p. 209)
    5. Objectives :
    The effectiveness of reading stories to develop young learners’
    vocabulary,and improve K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary. (p. 209)
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms:
    Many studies on the use of story reading to develop learners’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading aloud positively affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005).
    (p. 211)
    Combined with text-based discussions facilitating about words, reading aloud provide contexts and opportunities for children to learn new words before they have the reading skills necessary to acquire vocabulary independently (Biemiller, 2001). (p.211)

    Methodology Section

    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care (included) : This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p. 211)
    2. Sample preparation techniques : (excluded)
    3. Origins of samples and materials (included) : The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p. 211)
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data (included) : The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data (observation, documentation, and interview). The non-test techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p. 211)
    5. Statistical analysis techniques (included) : To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17, to analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed (p.211)
    6. Information on computer programs used (included) : SPSS version 17 (p. 211)
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function (included) :
    To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. (p.211)

    Results Section

    1. General statements presenting the key results (data) (included) :
    All three paired-samples t-tests above disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle.(p. 220)

    2. Charts and tables that present the data (included) :
    * Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    * Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    * Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    * Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    * Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    * Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    * Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    * Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    * Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    * Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    * Table 11:T-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    * Table 12: T-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    * Table 13: T-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    * Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (p. 212-221)

    3. Statistical analyses (included) :
    Table 11 reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I. (p. 219)
    Table 12 reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test I.Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test II. (p. 219)
    Table 13, t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and Post-test III. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 220)

    Discussion Section

    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section (included) :
    # In cycle I revealed that although all participants loved stories and stories with pictures, only 40% of them loved learning vocabulary . (p. 220)
    # In Cycle II, 60% of the students had been interested to learn vocabulary using stories, 20% managed to understand the story though they faced strange words, and 80% had realized their vocabulary mastery increased after listening to the stories.using stories. (p. 220-221)
    # In Cycle III, the improvement even went further. All of the students were now interested to learn vocabulary using stories, 60% managed to understand the story though they faced strange words, and 100% had realized their vocabulary mastery increased after listening to the stories. (p. 221)
    Conclusion Section
    1. A succinct summary of implications of the findings (included) :
    This increase of engagement then increased their achievement, as shown by the results of post-tests conducted at the end of every cycle. (p. 221)
    2. General implications of the study (included) :
    The implications of the study are the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle.(p. 221)
    3. Suggestions for further research (included) :
    Realizing its high effectiveness kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development.(p. 221)

    References Section

    1. How many sources are listed? there are 14 sources listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only? yes, it does.

  12. Name : Naomi Anitasari
    SRN : 1112150034

    Introduction Section

    1. Problem & its background: (Included)
    Problem : The biggest problem is the students face their lack of vocabulary based on the researcher’s observation (p.208)
    Its background : Teaching English to young learners, including in kindergarten, is now a
    common phenomenon in most big cities in Indonesia is teaching English to young learners, including in kindergarten. Although the practice was under serious attacks, bilingual education (using Indonesian and English as the medium of teaching and learning) keeps on flourishing in Indonesia. (p.208)

    2. Specific problem to be studied; (Included)
    They lose their focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master because of If students do not know the meaning of many of the words that they listen to in a conversation or encounter in a text, their comprehension is likely to be compromised. (p.208)

    3. Reasons of importance to study: (Included)
    To increase the learners’ vocabulary mastery should be made the first priority. (p.208)

    4. Hypothesis: (Included)
    If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase (p.209)

    5. Objectives: (Included)
    The effectiveness of reading stories to develop young learners’ vocabulary, the researcher would like to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary. (p.209)

    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included)
    Many studies on the use of story reading to develop learners’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading aloud positively affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005). (p.211)

    Methodology Section
    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care
    (Included). This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two
    month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)

    2. Sample preparation techniques;
    (Included). The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the
    researcher. (p.211)

    3. Origins of samples and materials;
    (Included). The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)

    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data;
    (Included). The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non test techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p.211)

    5. Statistical analysis techniques
    (Included). The quantitative data was analyzed by using SPSS version 17 and the qualitative data was analyzed by descriptive analysis technique. (p. 211)

    6. Information on computer programs used
    (Included). To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test
    was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)

    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function.
    (Included). To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. (p.211)

    Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data).
    (Included). Three paired-samples t-tests above disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. Therefore, the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (p.220)

    2. Charts and tables that present the data. (Included)
    • Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    • Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    • Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    • Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    • Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    • Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    • Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    • Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    • Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    • Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    • Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    • Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    • Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    • Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (p. 212-221)

    3. Statistical analyses (Included)
    • Table 11 above reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I. This result shows that when students are taught vocabularies using story reading technique, their achievement increases (p.219)
    • Table 12 above reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test I. This results use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement. (p.219)
    • Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test II. This result use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement (p.220)

    Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section (Included)
    This continuous improvement of students’ achievement is clearly illustrated by Chart 1. These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted (p.220)

    Conclusion Section
    1. A succinct summary of implications of the findings; (Included)
    The effective way is using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary (p.221)
    2. General implications of the study; (Included)
    Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p. 221)
    3. Suggestions for further research. (Included)
    Kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. (p.221)

    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed? There are fourteen sources listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does.

  13. Name : Dewi Natalia Perangin-angin
    NIM : 1112150042
    Introduction section
    1. Problem & background: (Included)
    Kindergarten students’ lack of vocabulary and this is a problem of them and they have lost focus and their motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master. (p. 208).
    2. Specific problem: (Included)
    If students don’t understand and know the meaning of the words that they listen a conversation or encounter in text, their comprehension is likely to be compromised. (p. 208)
    3. Reasons of importance to study: (Included)
    The growth of vocabulary knowledge is an essential prerequisite for language acquisition, because a teaching-learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary.(p.208)
    4. Hypothesis: (Included)
    If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p. 209)
    5. Objectives: (Included)
    The researcher in this current study would like to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary.
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms:
    Many studies on the use of story reading to develop learners’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading aloud positively affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005). (p.211)
    Methodology Section
    1. Subjects and their pre-experiment handling and care : (Included)
    This study is a three cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)
    2. Sample preparation techniques : (Included)
    The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher. (p.211)
    3 .Origins of samples and materials : (Included)
    The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data : (Included)
    The test was used to collect the quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. The test was carried out four times; pre-test, post-test I, post-test II, post-test III. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211) The non-test was used to collect the qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. The non-test was carried out using observation sheet, documentation, and interview guides. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p. 211)
    5. Statistical analysis techniques : (Included)
    – The quantitative data was analyzed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211)
    – The qualitative data was analyzed by descriptive analysis technique. (p. 211)
    6. Information on computer programs used : (Included)
    The t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function : (Included)
    To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. (p.211)

    Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data) : (Included)
    All three paired-samples t-tests disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. (p. 220)

    2. Charts and tables that present the data. : (Included)
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    (pp. 212-221)

    3.Statistical analyses :
    * Table 11, the t-count is 3.873, significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), There was a significant difference between the score of pre-test and post-test I. Specifically, this result suggests that when students are taught vocabularies using story reading technique, their achievement increases. (p. 219)
    * Table 12, the t-count is 9.000, sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), There was significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test II. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 219)
    * Table 13, t-count is 3.674, sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), There was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and Post-test III. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 220)

    Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section : Included
    Cycle I : Only 40% of them loved learning vocabulary using stories. Cycle II: 60% most of students to be active in asking questions or doing the worksheets. Cycle III :The students were interested to learn vocabulary using stories, 60% managed to understand the story though they faced strange words, and 100% had realized their vocabulary mastery increased after listening to the stories. 60% had got “good” score, and no more students got the scores below the minimum passing standard. The students’ activeness was even higher. The action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (pp. 220-221)

    Conclusion Section
    1. A succinct summary of implications of the findings : (Included)
    The using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p. 221)
    2. General implications of the study : (Included)
    The students should be engaged in open-ended questions, discussion and other relevant activities carried out after the session of listening to the stories. (p.222)
    3. Suggestions for further research : Included
    To maximize the students’ engagement, putting Shed Duke’s (2008) suggestions is highly recommended. (p.222)

    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed?
    14 sources listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only?
    Yes, it does.

  14. Name : Mei Pangaribuan
    SIN : 1112150015

    Morning sir, I had done the Scientific Articles Structure assignment. Here I send it.

    Introduction Section

    1. Problem & its background:
    Based on the researcher’s observation, the biggest problem the students face is their lack of vocabulary. This often causes them to lose focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master. ( p.208)

    2. Specific problem to be studied;
    Vocabulary teaching is possibly one of the areas in ELT that provide the most diverse strategies and techniques. These strategies and techniques could be classified into direct and indirect approaches. (p. 208)

    3. Reasons of importance to study:
    The growth of vocabulary knowledge is an essential prerequisite for language acquisition, because a teaching – learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary, which makes them unable to comprehend English. (p.208)

    4. Hypothesis:
    “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase.” (p.209)

    5. Objectives:
    To realize the effectiveness of reading stories to develop young learners’ vocabulary, the researcher in this current study would like to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary. (p.209)

    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms:
    The effectiveness of using story reading to develop children’s vocabulary relies on active engagement in the reading by both adults and children (Shed and Duke, 2008). (p.210)

    . Methodology Section
    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care
    The 10 K-I students in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta (p.211)

    2. Sample preparation techniques;
    The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. (p.211)

    3. Origins of samples and materials;
    The data was collected using test and non-test instruments.

    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data;
    The time triangulation was conducted by collecting data in different times (three cycles) and from different sources (students, observer, and test) (p.211)

    5. Statistical analysis techniques
    Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non -test techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide. (p.211)

    6. Information on computer programs used
    To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)

    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function.
    To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. (p.211)

    Results Section

    1. General statements presenting the key results (data)
    “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.

    2. Charts and tables that present the data.
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores (p.212)
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I (p.213)
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I (p.214)
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I (p.214)
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II (p.215)
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II (p.216)
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II (p.216)
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III (p.217)
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III (p.218)
    Table 10: Participants’ Post -Test Scores of Cycle III (p.218)
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I (p.219)
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and Post Test II (p.219)
    Table 13: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I (p.220)
    Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (p.221)

    3. statistical analyses
    Table 11 above reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Here as the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I. Table 12 above reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test I. Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test II.

    Discussion Section
    These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.

    Conclusion Section
    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings;
    As shown by the results of post -tests conducted at the end of every cycle using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective

    2. general implications of the study;
    The improvement in class management, attention to every individual, and performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle.

    3. Suggestions for further research.
    Realizing its high effectiveness, kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. While implementing the technique, teachers should make sure that students do not listen to the stories only “for stories”

    References Section
    How many sources are listed? There are 14 sources.
    Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does.

    .

  15. good morning sir,
    name: Erika Magdalena Septiana
    nim: 1112150901
    class: B

    A. Introduction Section:
    1. Problem and its background: the main problem students are are lack of their vocabulary and it causes them to lose focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and finding English difficult to master. This problem often happen to young learner or kindergarden.
    2. Specific problem to be studied: If students do not know the meaning of the words, the students can not understand the text in reading comprehension and speak well in English for communication.
    3. Reasons of importance to study: increasing the vocabulary is an assential for acquisition in English as English Foreign Language. So, vocabulary mastery must be main priority for students.
    4. Hypothesis: If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p.209).
    5. Objectives: the effectiveness in reading will develop the vocabulary for students, researchers looked at whether the story reads as teaching activities complementary significantly to improve K-1 students’ vocabulary EFL classroom. (p.209).
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: several studies in the use of story reading to increase students’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading is positively to affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005). (p.211).

    B. Methodology Section
    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care: (included): The 10 K-I students in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)

    2. Sample preparation techniques: The participants of the research were the 10. the technique used K-I students taught by the researcher.
    3. Origins of samples and materials: (Included) – The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data: (included) The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Qualitative data were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview.
    5. Statistical analysis techniques: The quantitative data was analyzed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211). Then, qualitative data was analyzed by descriptive analysis technique. (p. 211) 6. Information on computer programs used: (included) using SPSS version 17.
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function: (included) To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed.

    C. Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data): (Included) This study about a three- cycled which is all three paired-samples t-tests disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. (p. 220).
    2. charts and tables that present the data: (Included)
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (pp. 212-221)
    3.statistical analyses: Table 11 proofs that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of pre-test and post-test I. Specifically, this result suggests that when students are taught vocabularies using story reading technique, their achievement increases. (p. 219)
    -Table 12 proofs that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test II. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 219)
    – Table 13 proofs that t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and Post-test III. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 220)
    D. Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section: These findings are consistent with the results of the three-paired samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.

    E. Conclusion Section
    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings: Using story reading to increase student’s vocabulary is very effective. (p. 221)
    2. general implications of the study: Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p. 221)

    3. suggestions for further research: Kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an good alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. (p. 221)

    F. References Section
    1. How many sources are listed? There are 14 sources are listed
    2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does.

    thank you sir

  16. Introduction Section

    1. Problem & its background : Included
    Teaching English to young learners is a common phenomenon in most big cities in Indonesia use bilingual education. The students, in kindergarten, are lack of the vocabulary and it causes them to lose focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate and English difficult to master.(p.208)
    2. Specific problem to be studied: Included
    Vocabulary teaching is possibly one of the areas in ELT that provide the most diverse strategies and techniques and it could be classified into direct and indirect approaches.(p.208)
    3. Reasons of importance to study: Included
    The growth of vocabulary knowledge is an essential prerequisite for language acquisition, because a teaching-learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary.(p.208)
    4. Hypothesis: Included
    If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase.(p.209)
    5. Objectives: Included
    To realize the effectiveness of reading stories to develop young learners’ vocabulary whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary.(p.209)
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: Included
    The effectiveness of using story reading to develop children’s vocabulary relies on active engagement in the reading by both adults and children (Shed and Duke, 2008)

    Methodology Section
    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care : Included
    the 10 K-I students in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta.(p.211)
    2. Sample preparation techniques : Excluded
    3. Origins of samples and materials : Included
    The data was collected using test and non-test instruments.
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact
    location Procedures for collecting data : Included
    This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012)for the 10 K-I students, in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non-test techniques were carried out using observation sheet documentation andinterview guide.
    5. Statistical analysis techniques : Included
    The qualitative ( observation, documentation, and interviee).
    the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17.(p.211)
    6. Information on computer programs used : Included
    SPSS version 17.(p.211)
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function :
    The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data (observation, documentation, and interview). Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non-test techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide. To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. (p.211)

    Results Section

    1. General statements presenting the key results (data): Included
    The use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in
    each cycle.(p.220)
    2. charts and tables that present the data : Included
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and Post Test II
    Table 13: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score
    (p.212-221)
    3. statistical analyses: Included
    Table 11 above reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I.
    Table 12 above reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig.(2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test I.
    Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig.(2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test II.

    Discussion Section

    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section:
    The action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.

    Conclusion Section

    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings : Included
    The results of posttests conducted at the end of every cycle indicates that using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p.221)
    2. general implications of the study: Included
    The improvement in class management, attention to every individual, and performance in the story reading, enthusiasm and involvement of the students. (p.221)
    3. suggestions for further research : Included
    Kindergarten EFL teachers must use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development and maximize the students’ engagement.(p.221-222)

    References Section

    1. How many sources are listed? There are 14 sources
    2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes,it does

  17. Name :Desiana Sianturi
    SIN : 1112150022
    Class : BS- A

    G.Night, sir.
    here is my second assignment of Scientific Writing

    Introduction Section
    1. Problem and its background: (included) – the problem is the students face lack of vocabulary.; the background is they often lose their focus and motivation, so they unable to express what they want to communicate and find English difficult to master. (p.208)
    2. Specific problem to be studied: (included) – this often causes them to lose focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find Englishdifficult to master. (p.208)
    3. Reasons of importance to study: (included) – because vocabulary is very essential for comprehension and communication. If students don’t know the meaning of many words that they listen to in a conversation or encounter in a text, their comprehension is likely to be compromised. (p.208)
    4. Hypothesis : (included) – if the reading stories techniques is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p.209)
    5. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (included) – Vocabulary has an important role in all aspects of language. Without it nothing can be conveyed, cannot express his idea and learn about new concepts without having enough vocabulary. That is why vocabulary teaching itself is also a most important because students’ language is related to the mastery of vocabulary that will affect the quality and quantity of language. (p.209-210)
    Methodology Section
    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care : (inckuded) – the 10 K-I students in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)
    2. Sample preparation techniques: (included) – make quations for interview, pre-test and post-test for K-I to get quantitative and qualitative data. (p.211)
    3. Origins of samples and materials; (Excluded)
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data; (Included) – This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher. (p.211)
    5. Statistical analysis techniques: (Included) – Collect qualitative data, including:observation, documentation, and interview. Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non-test techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p.211)
    6. Information on computer programs used: (Included) – Using SPSS version 17. (p.211)
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function: (Included) – the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. (p.211)
    Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data): (Included) – the results indicated that the story reading techniques improved the partisipants’ vocabulary mastery as shown by increase of the mean score of the test conducted.
    2. Charts and tables that present the data: (Included)
    a. Tabel 1 (Participants’ Pre-Test Scores) with total frequency is 10 and percentage is 100.
    b. Tabel 2 (Observation Results of Cycle I) there are four sessions. With total and percentage In session 1 : 3 and 50%; session 2 : 3 and 50 %; session 3 : 4 and 67 % ; session 4 : 5 and 83 %.
    c. Table 3 (Interview Result of Cycle I) there are five quations with Yes and No quations.
    d. Table 4 (Participants’ Post -Test Scores of Cycle I) with frequency 10 and percentage 100
    e. Table 5(Observation Results of Cycle II) same as table 2, there are four sessions. With total and percentage In session 1 : 3 and 50%; session 2 : 3 and 50 %; session 3 : 4 and 67 % ; session 4 : 5 and 83 %.
    f. Table 6(Interview Result of Cycle II) same as table 3 there are five quations with Yes and No quations.
    g. Table 7 (Participants’ Post -Test Scores of Cycle II) total frequency 10 and percentage 100
    h. Table 8 (Observation Results of Cycle III) there are four sessions. With total and percentage In session 1 : 5 and 83%; session 2 : 5 and 83%; session 3 : 5 and 83%; session 4 : 6 and 100 %. In this observation the date ware increased.
    i. Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    j. Table 10 ( Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    k. Table 11(t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I) Table 11 above reveals that the t-count is 3.873with the significant sig.(2-tailed) 0.004.
    l. Table 12: (t-test result of the Post-Test I and Post Test II)
    m. Table 13: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    n. Chart 1(Participants’ Tests Mean Score) : Pre test is 42, Post-Test I is 60, Post-Test II is 80 and Post-Test III is 92 in mean score (p.212-221)

    3. Statistical analyses: (included)
    Table 11 above reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I.
    Table 12 above reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and
    post-test I.
    Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig.
    (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we
    can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and
    post-test II. (p.219-220)
    Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section: (Included)
    a. Cycle I, Only 40% of them loved learning vocabulary using stories
    b. Cycle II, 60% of the students had been interested to learn vocabulary using stories, 20% managed to understand the story though they faced strange words, and 80% had realized their vocabulary mastery increased after listening to the stories.
    c. Cycle III, All of the students were now interested to learn vocabulary using stories, 60%
    managed to understand the story though they faced strange words, and 100%
    had realized their vocabulary mastery increased after listening to the stories.
    These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples
    t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is
    used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is (p. 220-221)
    accepted.
    Conclusion Section
    1. A succinct summary of implications of the findings; (included) – To develop and increasing the young learners’ vocabulary using story reading is very effective.(p.221)
    2. General implications of the study;(included) – increase of engagement then increased their achievement, as shown by the results of posttests conducted at the end of every cycle. (p.221)
    3. Suggestions for further research : (Included) – The students should fully be engaged in open-ended questions, discussion and other relevant activities carried out after the session of listening to the stories. To maximize the students’ engagement, putting Shed
    and Duke’s. (P.221)
    References Section
    1. There are 14 listed reference.
    2. Yes, it does.

    THANK YOU, SIR.

  18. YULIA LESTARI TARIHORAN
    1112150041
    BS-B

    Introduction Section

    1. Problem & its background (Included):
    Problem : Based on the researcher’s observation, the biggest problem is the students face their lack of vocabulary. (p.208)
    Its backgroud : Teaching English to young learners, including in kindergarten, is now a
    common phenomenon in most big cities in Indonesia. Although the practice
    was under serious attacks, bilingual education (using Indonesian and English as the medium of teaching and learning) keeps on flourishing in Indonesia. (p.208)

    2. Specific problem to be studied (included);
    To increase the learners’ vocabulary mastery should be made the first priority. (p.208)

    3. Reasons of importance to study (included):
    The growth of the vocabulary knowledge is an essential pre-requisite for language acquisition, because teaching-learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary, which makes them unable to comprehend English (p. 208)

    4. Hypothesis (included):
    If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase (p.209)

    5. Objectives (included):
    Reading stories is one of the most effective ways teachers can use to design interesting and meaningful situations to teach EFL vocabulary to young learners. (p.209)

    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms (included):
    Many studies on the use of story reading to develop learners’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading aloud positively affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005). (p.211)

    Methodology Section

    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care (included):
    This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)
    2. Sample preparation techniques (included);
    The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. (p.211)
    3. Origins of samples and materials (included);
    The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data (included);
    The time triangulation was conducted by collecting data in different times (three cycles) and from different sources (students, observer, and tests). (P.211)
    5. Statistical analysis techniques (included);
    Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III.(p.211)
    6. Information on computer programs used (included);
    To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function (included) ;
    To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. (p.211)

    Results Section

    1. General statements presenting the key results (data) (included):
    the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is
    used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (p.220)

    2. Charts and tables that present the data (included);
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores (p.212)
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I (p.213)
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I (p.214)
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I (p.214)
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II (p.215)
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II (p.216)
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II (p.216)
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III (p.217)
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III 9p.218)
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III (p.218)
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I (p.219)
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and Post Test II (p.219)
    Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (p.221)
    3. Statistical analyses (included):
    Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test II. (p.220)

    Discussion Section

    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section (included):
    These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique isused, the K-1
    grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (p.221)

    Conclusion Section

    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings (included):
    Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, and performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p.221)
    2. general implications of the study (Included);
    Using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p,221)
    3. suggestions for further research (included);
    kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. (p.221)

    References Section

    1. How many sources are listed?
    There are 14 sources are listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only?
    Yes, it does.

    1. REVISION

      YULIA LESTARI TARIHORAN
      1112150041
      BS-B

      Sir this is my revision:

      1. Problem & its background (Included):
      Problem : Based on the researcher’s observation, the biggest problem is the students face their lack of vocabulary. (p.208)
      Its backgroud : Teaching English to young learners, including in kindergarten, is now a common phenomenon in most big cities in Indonesia. Although the practice
      was under serious attacks, bilingual education (using Indonesian and English as the medium of teaching and learning) keeps on flourishing in Indonesia. (p.208).

      2. Specific problem to be studied (included):
      The specific problem are: (1) How does the use of reading story technique affect the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary learning? (2) Does the use of reading stories technique improve the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery? (p.208)

      3. Reasons of importance to study: (Included)
      To show whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary and how it is done (p.208).

      4. Hypothesis: (Included)
      If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p.209)

      6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included)
      Many studies on the use of story reading to develop learners’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading aloud positively affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005). (p.211)

      Methodology Section

      1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care : (Included) This study is a three- cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)
      2. Sample preparation techniques : (Included) The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher. (p.211)
      3. Origins of samples and materials : (Included) The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)
      4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data : (Included) The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. (p.211)
      5. Statistical analysis techniques : (Included) tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. (p.211)
      6. Information on computer programs used (included);
      To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)
      7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function (included) ;
      To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. (p.211)
      Results Section
      1. General statements presenting the key results (data) (included):
      the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is
      used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (p.220)
      2. Charts and tables that present the data (included);
      Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores (p.212)
      Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I (p.213)
      Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I (p.214)
      Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I (p.214)
      Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II (p.215)
      Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II (p.216)
      Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II (p.216)
      Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III (p.217)
      Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III 9p.218)
      Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III (p.218)
      Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I (p.219)
      Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and Post Test II (p.219)
      Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (p.221)

      Conclusion Section
      1. A succinct summary of implications of the findings : (Included) Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, and performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p.221)
      2. General implications of the study : (Included) The students should fully be engaged in open-ended questions, discussion and other relevant activities carried out after the session of listening to the stories. (p.222)
      3. Suggestions for further research : (Included) To maximize the students’ engagement, putting Shed Duke’s (2008) suggestions is highly recommended. (p.222)
      References Section
      1. How many sources are listed?
      There are 14 sources are listed.
      2. Does it include cited sources only?
      Yes, it does. The sources are included in that article.
      these are several sample sources:
      Katz, M. J. (2009). From research to manuscript: A guide to scientific
      writing. Cleveland: Springer.
      Language Learning & Technology. (2010). LLT research guidelines for
      quantitative and qualitative research. Retrieved on April 24, 2010
      from: http://llt.msu.edu/resguide.html

      Thank you.

  19. Name : CIANLY
    Sin : 1112150047
    Class : B

    Itroduction section
    1. Problem and its background : (included)
    Problem : he biggest problem the students face is their lack of vocabulary. This often causes them to lose focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master.
    Background : Teaching English to young learners, including in kindergarten, is on phenomenon in most big cities in Indonesia.
    2. Specific problem to be studied : (included)
    vocabulary is very essential for comprehension and communication. If students do not know the meaning of many of the words that they listen to in a conversation or encounter in a text, their comprehension is likely to be compromised
    3. Reasons of importance to study: (Included)
    Vocabulary teaching is possibly one of the areas in ELT that provide the
    most diverse strategies and techniques.
    4. Hypothesis: (Included)
    If the reading stories technique is used,
    the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase
    5. Objectives: (Included)
    the researcher in this current study would like to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary.
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included)
    Language learners can benefit from story telling because stories help them to
    develop the ability to understand spoken language and engage in thinking skills.
    Besides, with the stories children develop learning strategies such as listening
    for general meaning, predicting, guessing meaning and hypothesizing.

    Methodology Section

    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre – experiment handling and care: (Included) : This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta.
    2. Sample preparation techniques : (Included)
    The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement.
    3. Origins of samples and materials: (Included)
    The data was collected using test and non-test instruments.
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data: (Included)
    The data was collected using test and non- test instruments. The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non-test techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed.

    Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data): (Included)
    All three paired -samples t- tests above disclose that the use of story
    reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in
    each cycle. Therefore, the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is
    used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.
    2. Charts and tables that present the data: (Included)
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score
    3. Statistical analyses :
    Table 11 above reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig.(2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the pre- test and post –
    test I.

    Table 12 above reveals that the – count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2 – tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t – table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n -1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t – count (9.000) > t – table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post – test I and post – test I.
    Table 13: t- test result of the Pre- Test and Post- Test I Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-
    tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n – 1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t – count (3.674) > t –
    table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post – test II and post – test II.

    Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section: These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired -samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.

    Conclusion Section
    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings: (Included)
    This increase of engagement then increased their achievement, as shown by the results of post-tests conducted at the end of every cycle. This indicates that using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective.
    2. general implications of the study: (Included)
    kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development.
    3. suggestions for further research: (Included)
    The students should fully be engaged in open – ended
    questions, discussion and other relevant activities carried out after the session of listening to the stories. To maximize the students’ engagement, putting Shed and Duke’s (2008) suggestions is highly recommended.

    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed?
    There are fourteen (14) sources listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only?
    Yes, it does. There are 16 citations

  20. NAME : MEGA INTAN SARI
    NIM : 1112150012
    CLASS : A

    Introduction Section

    1. Problem & its background:
    Despite their parents’ enthusiasm, many students, especially those attending kindergarten, face some problems. Based on the researcher’s observation, the biggest problem the students face is their lack of vocabulary. (p. 208)
    2. Specific problem to be studied;
    Vocabulary is very essential for comprehension and communication. If students do not know the meaning of many of the words that they listen to in a conversation or encounter in a text, their comprehension is likely to be compromised.(p.208)
    3. Reasons of importance to study:
    students need to learn vocabulary because otherwise they will not be able to express and articulate themselves in a way that other students or native speakers of English can understand them. (p.208)
    4. Hypothesis:
    If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade
    students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p.209)
    5. Objectives:
    effectiveness in reading will develop the vocabulary for students, researchers looked at whether the story reads as teaching activities complementarysignificantly to improve K-1 students’ vocabulary EFL classroom. (p.209)
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms:
    vocabulary teaching itself is also a most important because students’ language is related to the mastery of vocabulary that will affect the quality and quantity of language. Thus, improving and teaching vocabulary needs to have more attention since earlier stage (kindergarten). (p.210)

    Methodology Section
    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care :
    This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)
    2. Sample preparation techniques;
    The 10 K-I students taught by the researcher. (p.211)
    3. Origins of samples and materials;
    The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data;
    The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’
    vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. (p.211)
    5. Statistical analysis techniques :
    Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. The non-test techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (P.211)
    6. Information on computer programs used :
    To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function :
    To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. The methodological triangulation was administered by using more than one method for data collection, i.e. observations, interviews, and tests. The theoretical triangulation was carried out by using more than one theoretical scheme in the interpretation of the phenomenon. The time triangulation was conducted by
    collecting data in different times (three cycles) and from different sources (students, observer, and tests).

    Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data)
    All three paired-samples t-tests above disclose that the use of story readingtechnique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. (p. 220)
    2. charts and tables that present the data.
    Those are thirteen tables and one charts.
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and Post Test II Table 13: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score
    3. statistical analyses
    Table 11 above reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I. Table 12 above reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test I.Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test II. (p. 219)

    Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section :
    In cycle I revealed that although all participants loved stories and stories with pictures, only 40% of them loved learning vocabulary using stories.In Cycle II, the majority of students began to be active in asking questions or doing the worksheets. In Cycle III, their activeness was even higher. And a consequence of the increase of their engagement, the scores they achieved keeps on increasing. In the post test of Cycle II, only 20% of the students got “good” score, and 20% still got the scores below the minimum passing standard. But in the post test of Cycle III, 60% had got “good” score, and no more students got the scores below the minimum passing standard. These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (p. 220-221)

    Conclusion Section
    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings;
    The improvement in class management, attention to every
    individual, and performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and
    involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle.(P. 221)
    2. general implications of the study;
    This indicates that using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (P. 221)
    3. suggestions for further research:
    To maximize the students’ engagement, putting Shed and Duke’s (2008) suggestions is highly recommended. (P. 222)

    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed?
    There are 14 sources are listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only?
    Yes, it does.

  21. Name : Gladys Yusiva Doane
    SRN : 111-21-500-46
    Class : BS (B)

    Introduction Section

    1.Problem and Its Background : (Included) – Based on the researcher’s
    observation, the biggest problem the students face is their lack of vocabulary.

    2.Specific problem to be studied : (Included) – This often causes them to lose focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master. This is natural because vocabulary is very essential for comprehension and communication. (p.208)

    3.Reasons of importance to study: (Included) – to increase the learners’ vocabulary mastery should be made the first priority. (p.208)

    4.Hypothesis : (Included) – If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p.209)

    5.Objectives : (Included) – the effectiveness of reading stories to develop young learners’ vocabulary, the researcher in this current study would like to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary. (p.209)

    6.Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included) –Many studies on the use of story reading to develop learners’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading aloud positively affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005). (p.211)

    Methodology Section

    1.Subjects and their pre-experiment handling and care : (Included) – This study is a three cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)

    2.Sample preparation techniques : (Included) – The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher. (p.211)

    3.Origins of samples and materials : (Included) – The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)

    4.Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data : (Included) – The test was used to collect the quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. The test was carried out four times; pre-test, post-test I, post-test II, post-test III. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211) The non-test was used to collect the qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. The non-test was carried out using observation sheet, documentation, and interview guides. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p. 211)

    5.Statistical analysis techniques : (Included) – The quantitative data was analyzed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211) and The qualitative data was analyzed by descriptive analysis technique. (p. 211)

    6. Information on computer programs used : (Included) – To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, the t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)

    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function : (Included) – To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. (p.211)

    Results Section

    1.General statements presenting the key results (data) : (Included) – All three paired-samples t-tests disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. (p. 220)

    2.Charts and tables that present the data. : (Included) –
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (pp. 212-221)

    3.Statistical analyses :
    -Table 11, the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of pre-test and post-test I. Specifically, this result suggests that when students are taught vocabularies using story reading technique, their achievement increases. (p. 219)
    -Table 12, the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test II. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 219)
    -Table 13, t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and Post-test III. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 220)

    Discussion Section

    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section : (Included)
    – (Cycle I) Only 40% of them loved learning vocabulary using stories.
    – (Cycle II) 60% of the students had been interested to learn vocabulary using stories, 20% managed to understand the story though they faced strange words, and 80% had realized their vocabulary mastery increased after listening to the stories. Only 20% of the students got “good” score, and 20% still got the scores below the minimum passing standard. The majority of students began to be active in asking questions or doing the worksheets.
    – (Cycle III) The students were now interested to learn vocabulary using stories, 60% managed to understand the story though they faced strange words, and 100% had realized their vocabulary mastery increased after listening to the stories. 60% had got “good” score, and no more students got the scores below the minimum passing standard. The students’ activeness was even higher.
    The action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (pp. 220-221)

    Conclusion Section

    1.A succinct summary of implications of the findings : (Included) – The using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p. 221)
    2.General implications of the study : (Included) – Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p. 221)
    3.Suggestions for further research : (Included) – Kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. (p. 221)

    References Section

    1. How many sources are listed? There are 14 sources are listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does.

  22. NAME: Melva Melisa Tambunan
    SIN: 11. 121. 500. 16
    CLASS: A (2011)

    Introduction Section

    1. Problem & its background: (Included)
    it is a common phenomenon in most big Cities in Indonesia. Students difficult to master because of their lack of English vocabulary teaching. So that students are less communicate in English (p. 208)
    2. Specific problem to be studied: (Included)
    The growth of vocabulary knowledge is an essential pre – requisite for language acquisition, because a teaching – learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary, which makes them unable to comprehend English (p. 208)
    3. Reasons of importance to study: (Included)
    It is obvious that to increase the learners’ vocabulary mastery should be made the first priority. The growth of the vocabulary knowledge is an essential pre-requisite for language acquisition, because teaching-learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary, which makes them unable to comprehend English (p. 208)
    4. Hypothesis: (Included)
    If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p. 209)
    5. Objectives: (Included)
    Realizing the effectiveness of reading stories to develop young learners’ vocabulary, the researcher in this current study would like to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary. (p. 209)
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included)
    That is why vocabulary teaching itself is also a most important because students’ language is related to the mastery of vocabulary that will affect the quality and quantity of language. Thus, improving and teaching vocabulary needs to have more attention since earlier stage (kindergarten) (p. 210)

    Methodology Section

    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care: (Included) : The 10 K-I students in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p. 211)
    2. Sample preparation techniques: (Excluded)
    3. Origins of samples and materials: (Included) : The data was collected using test and non-test instruments.
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data: (Included) : This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students. (p. 211)
    5. Statistical analysis techniques: (Included) : The qualitative data was analyzed by descriptive analysis technique and the quantitative data was analyzed by using SPSS version 17 (p. 211)
    6. Information on computer programs used: (Included) : The quantitative data, SPSS version 17 (p. 211)
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function: (Included) : The test was used to collect the quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. The test was carried out four times; pre-test, post-test I, post-test II, post-test III. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. The non-test was used to collect the qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. The non-test was carried out using observation sheet, documentation, and interview guides. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p. 211)

    Results Section

    1. General statements presenting the key results (data) (Included) : All three paired-samples t-tests disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. (p. 220)
    2. Charts and tables that present the data: (Included)
    Those are 13 tables which present: (p. 212 – 220)
    (1) Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    (2) Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    (3) Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    (4) Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    (5) Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    (6) Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    (7) Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    (8) Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    (9) Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    (10) Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    (11) Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    (12) Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    (13) Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    And one chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (p. 221)
    3. Statistical Analyses: (Included)
    – Table 11 reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of pre-test and post-test I. Specifically, this result suggests that when students are taught vocabularies using story reading technique, their achievement increases. (p. 219)
    – Table 12 reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test II. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 219)
    – Table 13 reveals that t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and Post-test III. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement. (p. 220)

    Discussion Section

    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section: (Included)
    – (Cycle I) Only 40% of them loved learning vocabulary using stories.
    – (Cycle II) 60% of the students had been interested to learn vocabulary using stories, 20% managed to understand the story though they faced strange words, and 80% had realized their vocabulary mastery increased after listening to the stories. Only 20% of the students got “good” score, and 20% still got the scores below the minimum passing standard. The majority of students began to be active in asking questions or doing the worksheets.
    – (Cycle III) The students were now interested to learn vocabulary using stories, 60% managed to understand the story though they faced strange words, and 100% had realized their vocabulary mastery increased after listening to the stories. 60% had got “good” score, and no more students got the scores below the minimum passing standard. The students’ activeness was even higher.
    The action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (pp. 220-221)

    Conclusion Section

    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings: (Included)
    The using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p. 221)
    2. general implications of the study: (Included)
    Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p. 221)
    3. suggestions for further research: (Included)
    Realizing its high effectiveness, kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. (p. 221)

    References Section

    1. How many sources are listed?
    Answer : There are 14 sources listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only?
    Answer : Yes, it does.

  23. HARDIANTI A. TIAS
    11 121 500 49
    BS-B

    Introduction

    1. Problem & its background: (included) including in kindergarten, is now a common phenomenon in most big cities in Indonesia. Although
    2. Specific problem to be studied: (included) the biggest problem the students face is their lack of vocabulary.
    3. Reasons of importance to study: (included) it is obvious that to increase the learners’ vocabulary mastery should be made the first priority.
    4. Hypothesis:(included) “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase.”
    5. Objectives: (included) to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary.
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (included) The effectiveness of using story reading to develop children’s vocabulary relies on active engagement in the reading by both adults and children (Shed and Duke, 2008).

    Methodology Section
    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care: (included) This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. Sample preparation techniques;
    2. Origins of samples and materials; (included) The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher.
    3. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data; (included) The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview.
    4. Statistical analysis techniques : (included) To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed
    5. Information on computer programs used : (included) using SPSS version 17.
    6. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function : (included) To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study,
    methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed.

    Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data): (included) These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.
    2. charts and tables that present the data. (included)
    Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    This table shows only 1 student (10%) had attained the minimum standard. The scores obtained by the other 90% were below the minimum passing standard. The mean score of the whole students in this pre-test was 42.
    Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    The responses of the students indicated that all of them love story and love story with the picture. However, only 40% of them love to learn vocabulary using story. All of them did not understand a story containing unfamiliar words. Finally, all of them felt that their vocabulary mastery had not increased yet.

    3. statistical analyses: (included)
    Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I, reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
    of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I.
    Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and Post Test II, reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test I.
    Table 13: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I, Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test II.

    Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section: (included) In Cycle II, the majority of students began to be active in asking questions or doing the worksheets. In Cycle III, their activeness was even higher. And a consequence of the increase of their engagement, the scores they achieved keeps on increasing. In the post test of Cycle II, only 20% of the students got “good” score, and 20% still got the scores below the minimum passing standard. But in the post test of Cycle III, 60% had got “good” score, and no more students got the scores below the minimum passing standard.
    These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.

    Conclusion Section
    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings; (included) Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, and performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle.

    2. general implications of the study; (included) The students should fully be engaged in open-ended questions, discussion and other relevant activities carried out after the session of
    listening to the stories.
    3. suggestions for further research : (included) To maximize the students’ engagement, putting Shed and Duke’s (2008) suggestions is highly recommended.

    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed? There are 14 sources.
    2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does. The sources are including. For example:
    Many studies on the use of story reading to develop learners’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading aloud positively affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005).

    1. HARDIANTI A. TIAS
      11 121 500 49
      BS-B

      (REVISION)

      Introduction

      1. Problem & its background: (included) the problem is kindergarten students’ lake of vocabularies. background is Although vocabulary teaching has the most diverse techniques, and one of the most effective is reading stories, most kindergarten students are not taught using these technique.

      2. Specific problem to be studied: (included) (1) How does the use of reading
      story technique affect the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary learning? (2) Does the use of reading stories technique affect or improve the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery? (p. 209)

      3. Reasons of importance to study: (included) To show whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary and how it is done.

      4. Hypothesis:(included) “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase.”

      5. Objectives: (included) to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary.

      6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (included) The effectiveness of using story reading to develop children’s vocabulary relies on active engagement in the reading by both adults and children (Shed and Duke, 2008).

      Methodology Section

      1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care: (included) This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. Sample preparation techniques;

      2. Origins of samples and materials; (included) The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher.

      3. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data; (included) The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview.

      4. Statistical analysis techniques : (included) To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed

      5. Information on computer programs used : (included) using SPSS version 17.

      6. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function : (included) To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study,
      methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed.

      Results Section

      1. General statements presenting the key results (data): (included) These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.

      2. charts and tables that present the data. (included)
      a. Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
      This table shows only 1 student (10%) had attained the minimum standard. The scores obtained by the other 90% were below the minimum passing standard. The mean score of the whole students in this pre-test was 42.
      b. Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
      The responses of the students indicated that all of them love story and love story with the picture. However, only 40% of them love to learn vocabulary using story. All of them did not understand a story containing unfamiliar words. Finally, all of them felt that their vocabulary mastery had not increased yet.
      c. Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
      d. Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
      e. Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
      f. Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
      g. Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
      h. Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
      i. Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
      j. Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
      k. Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
      l. Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
      m. Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
      n. Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (pp. 212-221)

      3. statistical analyses: (included)
      Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I, reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees
      of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I.
      Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and Post Test II, reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test I.
      Table 13: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I, Table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test II.

      Discussion Section
      Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section: (included) In Cycle II, the majority of students began to be active in asking questions or doing the worksheets. In Cycle III, their activeness was even higher. And a consequence of the increase of their engagement, the scores they achieved keeps on increasing. In the post test of Cycle II, only 20% of the students got “good” score, and 20% still got the scores below the minimum passing standard. But in the post test of Cycle III, 60% had got “good” score, and no more students got the scores below the minimum passing standard.
      These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.

      Conclusion Section
      1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings; (included) Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, and performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle.

      2. general implications of the study; (included) The students should fully be engaged in open-ended questions, discussion and other relevant activities carried out after the session of
      listening to the stories.

      3. suggestions for further research : (included) To maximize the students’ engagement, putting Shed and Duke’s (2008) suggestions is highly recommended.

      References Section
      1. How many sources are listed? There are 14 sources.

      2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does. The sources are including. For example:
      Many studies on the use of story reading to develop learners’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading aloud positively affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005).

      Thank you sir…
      God bless you

  24. NAME : PUTRI WARINAGIA
    SRN : 11-121-500-36

    Introduction Section
    1. Problem & its background: (Included)
    Problem: Students are lack of vocabulary and it causes them to lose focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master. (p. 208)
    Background: a common phenomenon that bilingual education (using Indonesian and English as the medium of teaching and learning) keeps on flourishing in Indonesia. (p. 208)

    2. Specific problem to be studied: (Included)
    If students do not know the meaning of the words that they listen to in a conversation or encounter in text, their comprehension is likely to be compromised. (p. 208)

    3. Reasons of importance to study: (Included)
    The growth of the vocabulary knowledge is an essential pre-requisite for language acquisition, because teaching-learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary, which makes them unable to comprehend English (p. 208)

    4. Hypothesis: (Included)
    If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p. 209)

    5. Objectives: (Included)
    Her K-1 grade students’ EFL Vocabulary (p. 209)

    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included)
    The effectiveness of using story reading to develop children’s vocabulary relies on active engagement in the reading by both adults and children (Shed and Duke, 2008). (p. 210)

    Methodology Section
    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care: (Included)
    The participants were the 10 K-1 students taught by the researcher in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta.

    2. Sample preparation techniques: (Excluded)

    3. Origins of samples and materials: (Included)
    The data was collected using test and non-test instruments.

    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data: (Included)
    The test was used to collect the quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. The test was carried out four times; pre-test, post-test I, post-test II, post-test III. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211) The non-test was used to collect the qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. The non-test was carried out using observation sheet, documentation, and interview guides. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p. 211)

    5. Statistical analysis techniques: (Included)
    The quantitative data was analyzed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211)
    The qualitative data was analyzed by descriptive analysis technique. (p. 211)

    6. Information on computer programs used: (Included)
    SPSS version 17 (used for analyzing the quantitative data). (p. 211)

    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function: (Included)
    The test was used to collect the quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. The test was carried out four times; pre-test, post-test I, post-test II, post-test III. To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p. 211) The non-test was used to collect the qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. The non-test was carried out using observation sheet, documentation, and interview guides. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p. 211). To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed.

    Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data): (Included)
    All three-paired samples t-tests above disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. (p. 220)

    2. Charts and tables that present the data: (Included)
    Those are 13 tables which present: (p. 212 – 220)
    a) Participants’ Pre-Test Scores;
    b) Observation Results of Cycle I, II, III;
    c) Interview Results of Cycle I, II, III;
    d) Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I, II, III;
    e) t-test Result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    f) t-test Result of the Post-Test I and Post-Test II
    g) t-test Result of the Post-Test II and Post-Test III
    There is one chart which presents: (p. 221)
    Participants’ Tests Mean Score

    3. Statistical analysis: (Included)
    Table 11 reveals that the t-count is 3.873 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.004. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of pre-test and post-test I. (p. 219)
    Table 12 reveals that the t-count is 9.000 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.000. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test II. (p. 219)
    Table 13 reveals that t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with the significant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. Since t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and Post-test III. (p. 220)

    Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section:
    These findings are consistent with the results of the three-paired samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted.

    Conclusion Section
    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings: (Included)
    Using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p. 221)

    2. general implications of the study: (Included)
    Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p. 221)

    3. suggestions for further research : (Included)
    Kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development. (p. 221)

    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed?
    There are 14 sources are listed.

    2. Does it include cited sources only?
    Yes, it does. There are 16 citations.

  25. Jessica Talentia
    11 121 500 39

    Answer :

    That article consists of AIMReDCar and it includes the marks that Sir Parlin has elaborated.

    Introduction Section

    1. Problem & its background: (Included) the problem is the students face their lack of vocabulary teaching. The background of the problem is teaching English to young learners, including in kindergarten, is now a common phenomenon in most big cities in Indonesia. (p.208)

    2. Specific problem to be studied: (Included) they lose their focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master. (p.208)

    3. Reasons of importance to study: (Included) It is obvious that to increase the learners’ vocabulary mastery should be made the first priority. (p.208)

    4. Hypothesis: (Included) If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p.209)

    5. Objectives: (Included) Realizing the effectiveness of reading stories to develop young learners’ vocabulary, the researcher in this current study would like to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary. (p.209)

    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included) Many studies on the use of story reading to develop learners’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading aloud positively affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005). (p.211)

    Methodology Section

    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care : (Included) This study is a three- cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)

    2. Sample preparation techniques : (Included) The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher. (p.211)

    3. Origins of samples and materials : (Included) The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)

    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data : (Included) The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. (p.211)

    5. Statistical analysis techniques : (Included) tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. (p.211)

    6. Information on computer programs used : (Included) To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)

    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function : (Included) To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. (p.211)

    Results Section

    1. General statements presenting the key results (data) : (Included) Therefore, the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (p.220)

    2. Charts and tables that present the data : (Included)

    Table 1. Participants’ Pre-Test Scores (p.212)

    No Range of Score Category Frequency Percentage
    1 85-100 Good 0 0
    2 65-84 Making steady progress 1 10
    3 45-64 Need improvement 3 30
    4 20-44 Having difficulty 6 60
    Total 10 100

    3. Statistical analyses : (Included) table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with thesignificant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. (p.220)

    Discussion Section

    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section : (Included) These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (p.221)

    Conclusion Section

    1. A succinct summary of implications of the findings : (Included) Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, and performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p.221)

    2. General implications of the study : (Included) The students should fully be engaged in open-ended questions, discussion and other relevant activities carried out after the session of listening to the stories. (p.222)

    3. Suggestions for further research : (Included) To maximize the students’ engagement, putting Shed Duke’s (2008) suggestions is highly recommended. (p.222)

    References Section

    1. How many sources are listed? 14 names.

    2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does. The sources are included in that article.
    Facts :
    a. Sentence : A story, which is defined by Simmons (2006) as “a narrative……”
    b. Reference : Simmons, A. (2006). The story factor, inspiration, influence,
    and persuasion through the art of storytelling. New York: Basic Books

    1. REVISION

      Jessica Talentia
      11 121 500 39

      Answer :

      That article consists of AIMReDCar and it includes the marks that Sir Parlin has elaborated.

      Introduction Section

      1. Problem & its background: (Included) the problem is the students face their lack of vocabulary teaching. The background of the problem is teaching English to young learners, including in kindergarten, is now a common phenomenon in most big cities in Indonesia. (p.208)

      2. Specific problem to be studied: (Included) they lose their focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master. (p.208)

      3. Reasons of importance to study: (Included) It is obvious that to increase the learners’ vocabulary mastery should be made the first priority. (p.208)

      4. Hypothesis: (Included) If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p.209)

      5. Objectives: (Included) Realizing the effectiveness of reading stories to develop young learners’ vocabulary, the researcher in this current study would like to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve her K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary. (p.209)

      6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included) Many studies on the use of story reading to develop learners’ vocabulary have been carried out. Most of them revealed that reading aloud positively affects students’ vocabulary acquisition and comprehension (Cunningham, 2005). (p.211)

      Methodology Section

      1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care : (Included) This study is a three- cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p.211)

      2. Sample preparation techniques : (Included) The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students taught by the researcher. (p.211)

      3. Origins of samples and materials : (Included) The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p.211)

      4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data : (Included) The test technique was used to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. Non-test techniques were used to collect qualitative data, including: observation, documentation, and interview. (p.211)

      5. Statistical analysis techniques : (Included) tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III. (p.211)

      6. Information on computer programs used : (Included) To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (p.211)

      7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function : (Included) To guarantee the validity of the qualitative data obtained in this study, methodological, theoretical, and time triangulations were employed. (p.211)

      Results Section

      1. General statements presenting the key results (data) : (Included) Therefore, the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (p.220)

      2. Charts and tables that present the data: (Included)
      a. Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
      b. Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
      c. Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
      d. Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
      e. Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
      f. Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
      g. Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
      h. Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
      i. Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
      j. Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
      k. Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
      l. Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
      m. Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
      n. Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score

      3. Statistical analyses : (Included) table 13 above reveals that the t-count is 3.674 with the significant sig. (2-tailed) 0.005. Whereas the t-table with thesignificant level 0.05 and degrees of freedom (df) = n-1 = 9 is 2.262. (p.220)

      Discussion Section

      Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section : (Included) These findings are consistent with the results of the three paired-samples t-tests which reveal the action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (p.221)

      Conclusion Section

      1. A succinct summary of implications of the findings : (Included) Along with the improvement in class management, attention to every individual, and performance in the story reading, the students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle. (p.221)

      2. General implications of the study : (Included) The students should fully be engaged in open-ended questions, discussion and other relevant activities carried out after the session of listening to the stories. (p.222)

      3. Suggestions for further research : (Included) To maximize the students’ engagement, putting Shed Duke’s (2008) suggestions is highly recommended. (p.222)

      References Section

      1. How many sources are listed? 14 names.

      2. Does it include cited sources only? Yes, it does. The sources are included in that article.
      Facts :
      a. Sentence : A story, which is defined by Simmons (2006) as “a narrative……”
      b. Reference : Simmons, A. (2006). The story factor, inspiration, influence,
      and persuasion through the art of storytelling. New York: Basic Books

  26. NAME: Annery Fienta
    SIN: 1112150024
    CLASS: A

    Introduction Section
    1. Problem & its background: (Included) – The kindergarten students’ lack of vocabulary causes them to lose focus and motivation, unable to express what they want to communicate, and find English difficult to master. (p. 208)
    2. Specific problem to be studied: (Included) – Does the use of reading stories technique affect or improve the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery? (p. 209)
    3. Reasons of importance to study: (Included) – A teaching-learning process will not run well if the learners lack of vocabulary, which makes them unable to comprehend English and reading stories is one of the most effective ways teachers can use to improve young leaners’ English (pp. 208-209)
    4. Hypothesis: (Included) – If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p. 209)
    5. Objectives: (Included) – to see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve the researcher’s K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary. (p. 209)
    6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included) – (1) Vocabulary is a component of a particular language that maintains all information about meaning used by people in expressing ideas and learning about new concepts. (2) Story is a narrative account of an event or events –true or fictional. (pp. 209-210)

    Methodology Section
    1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care: (Included) – the 10 K-I students in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p. 211)
    2. Sample preparation techniques: (Excluded)
    3. Origins of samples and materials: (Excluded)
    4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data: (Included) – This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students. The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p. 211)
    5. Statistical analysis techniques: (Included) – To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p. 211)
    6. Information on computer programs used: (Included) – SPSS version 17 (p. 211)
    7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function: (Included) – Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. The non-test techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide to collect qualitative data. (p. 211)

    Results Section
    1. General statements presenting the key results (data): (Included) – All three paired-samples t-tests disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. (p. 220)
    2. charts and tables that present the data: (Included) –
    (1) Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
    (2) Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
    (3) Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
    (4) Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
    (5) Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
    (6) Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
    (7) Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
    (8) Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
    (9) Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
    (10) Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
    (11) Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
    (12) Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
    (13) Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
    (14) Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (pp. 212-221)
    3. statistical analyses: (Included) – Cycle 1 presented in table 11 reveals t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I. this result suggests that when students are taught vocabularies using story reading technique, their achievement increases. Cycle 2 presented in table 12 reveals t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test I. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement. Cycle 3 presented in table 13 reveals t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test III. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement. (pp. 219-220)

    Discussion Section
    Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section: (Included) – (1) In cycle I, only 40% of them loved learning vocabulary using stories. (2) In Cycle II, the majority of students began to be active in asking questions or doing the worksheets. (3) In Cycle III, the improvement even went further because the students’ activeness was even higher. The action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (pp. 220-221)

    Conclusion Section
    1. a succinct summary of implications of the findings: (Included) – The using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p. 221)
    2. general implications of the study: (Included) – The students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle then increased their achievement. (p. 221)
    3. suggestions for further research: (Included) – kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development and should make sure that students are fully engaged in open-ended questions, discussion and other relevant activities. (pp. 221-222)

    References Section
    1. How many sources are listed?
    There are fourteen (14) sources listed.
    2. Does it include cited sources only?
    Yes, it does.

    Thank you, Sir.

    1. NAME: Annery Fienta
      SIN: 1112150024
      CLASS: A

      (REVISION)

      Introduction Section
      1. Problem & its background: (Included) – The problem is kindergarten students’ lack of vocabulary. The background is that although vocabulary teaching has the most diverse techniques, and one of the most effective is reading stories, most kindergarten students are not taught using these technique. (p. 208)

      2. Specific problem to be studied: (Included) – (1) How does the use of reading
      story technique affect the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary learning? (2) Does the use of reading stories technique affect or improve the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery? (p. 209)

      3. Reasons of importance to study: (Included) – To show whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary and how it is done. (p. 209)

      4. Hypothesis: (Included) – If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase. (p. 209)

      5. Objectives: (Included) – To see whether story reading technique as a complementary teaching activity significantly improve the researcher’s K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary. (p. 209)

      6. Summary of previous relevant studies definitions of operational terms: (Included) – (1) Vocabulary is a component of a particular language that maintains all information about meaning used by people in expressing ideas and learning about new concepts. (2) Story is a narrative account of an event or events –true or fictional. (pp. 209-210)

      Methodology Section
      1. Subjects (humans, animals, plants) and their pre-experiment handling and care: (Included) – the 10 K-I students in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. (p. 211)

      2. Sample preparation techniques: (Excluded)

      3. Origins of samples and materials: (Excluded)

      4. Description of the field site, including physical and biological features, and exact location Procedures for collecting data: (Included) – This study is a three-cycled action research which was conducted in two month (May to June 2012) in Grace Kids Preschool, Kelapa Gading, Jakarta. The participants of the research were the 10 K-I students. The data was collected using test and non-test instruments. (p. 211)

      5. Statistical analysis techniques: (Included) – Mixed approach was employed in this article. (1) To analyze the quantitative data obtained from the tests, t-test was employed by using SPSS version 17. (2) To analyze the qualitative data, the descriptive analysis technique was employed. (p. 211)

      6. Information on computer programs used: (Included) – SPSS version 17 (p. 211)

      7. Descriptions of equipment set-up and function: (Included) – Tests were carried out four times; the pre-test, post test I, post test II, and post test III to collect quantitative data derived from the participants’ vocabulary achievement. The non-test techniques were carried out using observation sheet, documentation and interview guide to collect qualitative data. (p. 211)

      Results Section
      1. General statements presenting the key results (data): (Included) – All three paired-samples t-tests disclose that the use of story reading technique significantly increased the students’ vocabulary mastery in each cycle. (p. 220)

      2. Charts and tables that present the data: (Included) –
      (1) Table 1: Participants’ Pre-Test Scores
      (2) Table 2: Observation Results of Cycle I
      (3) Table 3: Interview Result of Cycle I
      (4) Table 4: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle I
      (5) Table 5: Observation Results of Cycle II
      (6) Table 6: Interview Result of Cycle II
      (7) Table 7: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle II
      (8) Table 8: Observation Results of Cycle III
      (9) Table 9: Interview Result of Cycle III
      (10) Table 10: Participants’ Post-Test Scores of Cycle III
      (11) Table 11: t-test result of the Pre-Test and Post-Test I
      (12) Table 12: t-test result of the Post-Test I and and Post Test II
      (13) Table 13: t-test result of the Post-Test II and and Post Test III
      (14) Chart 1: Participants’ Tests Mean Score (pp. 212-221)

      3. Statistical analyses: (Included) – Cycle 1 presented in table 11 reveals t-count (3.873) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test I. this result suggests that when students are taught vocabularies using story reading technique, their achievement increases. Cycle 2 presented in table 12 reveals t-count (9.000) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test I and post-test I. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle II had significantly increased their achievement. Cycle 3 presented in table 13 reveals t-count (3.674) > t-table (2.262), we can say there was a significant difference between the score of post-test II and post-test III. This suggests that use of story reading technique for teaching vocabularies in Cycle III had significantly increased their achievement. (pp. 219-220)

      Discussion Section
      Restatement and interpretation of the findings reported in the Results section: (Included) – (1) In cycle I, only 40% of them loved learning vocabulary using stories. (2) In Cycle II, the majority of students began to be active in asking questions or doing the worksheets. (3) In Cycle III, the improvement even went further because the students’ activeness was even higher. The action hypothesis “If the reading stories technique is used, the K-1 grade students’ EFL vocabulary mastery will increase” is accepted. (pp. 220-221)

      Conclusion Section
      1. A succinct summary of implications of the findings: (Included) – The using story reading to increase children’s vocabulary is very effective. (p. 221)

      2. General implications of the study: (Included) – The students’ enthusiasm and involvement kept on increasing from cycle to cycle then increased their achievement. (p. 221)

      3. Suggestions for further research: (Included) – Kindergarten EFL teachers are recommended to use story reading technique as an advantageous alternative to boost young learners’ vocabulary development and should make sure that students are fully engaged in open-ended questions, discussion and other relevant activities. (pp. 221-222)

      References Section
      1. How many sources are listed?
      There are fourteen (14) sources listed.

      2. Does it include cited sources only?
      Yes, it does.

      Thank you, Sir.

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