Short Story for Mid-Term Analysis


Dear all attendees of Literature II,

Please confirm the short story you are going to analyze for the mid-term assignment. Write down the title and author. Everyone should analyze different short story. In case two or more persons claim the same short story, only the first who claimed has the right to analyze it. Those who claim later should find another story.

Good luck!

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  1. A PLOT ANALYSIS OF Mo McAuley ‘Mr. STICKY’S’
    Introduction
    Fiction is undoubtedly the most interesting and the most widely read literary genre due to the realistic sense if offers. Compares to other types of literary works, fiction embodies experience, emotion and ideas about human life in a way which seems very close to relity. Despite this fact, readers often find it difficult to see the relationship among the actions and events that develop the plot. Some others may find it intricate to make out the theme. Some others find it complicated to figure out the characters’ qualities. Satill some others may encounter difficulties to relate the determine and relate viewpoint to the theme presented.
    This analysis is a venture to aid readers to appreciate fiction in general and Mr.Sticky in particular. The short story is interesting to analyze because it tells about the child who want to know about natural’s life in her enviropment.
    Synopsis of Mr.Sticky
    No one knew how Mr. Sticky got in the fish tank,because he’s very small as she peered at the tiny water snail. Just a black dot. But abby believe a snail will grow up. There is Gerry, the fat orange goldfish, was dozing inside the stone archway. Jaws was already awake, swimming along the front of the tank with his white tail floating and twitching. It took Abby a while to find Mr. Sticky because he was clinging to the glass near the bottom, right next to the gravel. At school that day she wrote about the mysterious Mr. Sticky who was so small you could mistake him for a piece of gravel. Some of the girls in her class said he seemed an ideal pet for her and kept giggling about it. That night Abby turned on the light to find Mr. Sticky clinging to the very tiniest, waviest tip of the pond weed. It was near the water filter so he was bobbing about in the air bubbles. She tried to imagine what it must be like to have to hang on to things all day and decided it was probably very tiring. She fed the fish then lay on her bed and watched them chase each other round and round the archway. When they stopped Gerry began nibbling at the pond weed with his big pouty lips. He sucked Mr. Sticky into his mouth then blew him back out again in a stream of water. The snail floated down to the bottom of the tank among the coloured gravel. But she don’t want a snail to get too big.
    At school that day, Abby drew an elephant. She needed two pieces of expensive paper to do both ends but the teacher didn’t mind because she was pleased with the drawing and wanted it on the wall. They sellotaped them together, right across the elephant’s middle. In the corner of the picture, Abby wrote her full name, Abigail, and drew tiny snails for the dots on the ‘i’s The teacher said that was very creative.
    At the weekend they cleaned out the tank.There’s a lot of algae on the sides. They scooped the fish out and put them in a bowl while they emptied some of the water. Mr. Sticky stayed out of the way, clinging to the glass while Mum used the special ‘vacuum cleaner’ to clean the gravel. Abby trimmed the new pieces of pond weed down to size and scrubbed the archway and the filter tube. Mum poured new water into the tank. Abby looked on all sides of the tank. There was no sign of the water snail. That evening Abby went up to her bedroom to check the tank. The water had settled and looked lovely and clear but there was no sign of Mr. Sticky. She lay on her bed and did some exercises, stretching out her legs and feet and pointing her toes. Stretching was good for your muscles and made you look tall a model had said on the t.v. and she looked enormous. When Abby had finished, she kneeled down to have another look in the tank but there was still no sign of Mr. Sticky. She went downstairs. Her mum was in the study surrounded by papers. She had her glasses on and her hair was all over the place where she’d been running her hands through it. She looked impatient when she saw Abby in the doorway and even more impatient when she heard the bad news. Abby felt her face go hot and red. It always happened when she was angry or upset.
    Abby angry and go to her bedroom, the door to the bedroom opened and Mum’s face appeared around the crack. Abby tried to ignore her but it was hard when she walked over to the bed and sat next to her. She was holding her glasses in her hand. She waved them at Abby.her mum show the pair of the snail, and bring the magnifying glass to saw both of them. They sat beside each other on the floor. On their knees they shuffled around the tank, peering into the corners among the big pebbles, at the gravel and the pondweed. Her mum cried and pointing something, there, tucked in the curve of the archway, perfectly hidden against the dark stone, sat Mr. Sticky. And right next to him was another water snail, even smaller than him. There is surprise because there is Mrs.Sticky.They both laughed and climbed into Abby’s bed together, cuddling down under the duvet. It was cozy but a bit of a squeeze. Abby put her head on her mum’s chest and smiled.
    Analysis of plot
    Mr.Sticky has a regular structure so that it can be neatly divided into four stages : exposition, complication, climax, and resolution. Exposition paragraph introduce the reader with the place and time setting and the two major characters, i.e. a snail got in the fish tank, the snail come suddenly. Abby, the little girl, found it,she gave a snail’s name was Mr.Sticky and she wanted to see the snail grow, so she let it lived in her tank with the fish.
    The conflict is directly proceeded with first complication i.e. Abby’s mother cleaned up the tank and Abby’s mother didn’t tell to abby that she had moved the snail to another thing.
    And the climax is reached when the tank is cleaned,then abby played with the fish and she look for the snail,she moved her finger to left and right to get attention but there was not a snail. She was angry then asked her mother, after that she cried.
    Soon after the climax, Mo McAuley presented the denouement, i.e. Abby’s mother persuaded her daughter and give surprise to her because there are two snail in the glass thing, abby was happy and she tried to looked at 2 snails ( Mr. Sticky and Mrs.Sticky) by a magnifying glass.
    Conclusion
    Although a snail as Mr.Sticky does not do anything, it can be the objective of this story, so that the story is written using a chonological plot is far from boring. Because this story is suitable for the children who like read this book, they can get many knowledge and they will think about the interesting moment that they ever done.
    Bibliography :
    Pardede, Parlindungan.2008. An Introduction to the study of fition. Jakarta
    http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/MrStic.shtml

  2. Sorry sir I change my short story become “They Say I’m Fat”
    Analysis of “They Say I’m Fat”
    By: Jhon Hawern

    Introduction
    Short story is the result of an author’s imagination. A short story is usually taken from an experience or observation of the author. Even short stories are usually drawn from a true story. The author usually makes a short story based on experience or observations which seem more realistic or close to real life readers. This analysis is one attempt to analyze the character of the figures in the story “They Say I’m Fat”.

    Synopsis Story
    This story tells about a girl named Gina who has chubby cheeks and a super body fat. She was having bad luck because his body fat makes him insecure. Everyone who saw him would always want to pinch his cheeks. Rudi Even when high school friends always wanted to pinch her cheeks Gina. Gina thinks when he entered the university there will be no friends to pinch his cheeks, but the fact is there still a nosy friend Gina to ridicule fat even though she no longer dared to pinch his cheeks.

    When entering the university Gina started to like a guy named Gunawan. Gunawan is a classmate Gina’s view of others, he is an ordinary guy wrote. But there is something that makes Gina interested in the attitude of Gunawan, who can accept what is.

    Lately Gina felt that Gunawan was medekati him. Proximity Gina and Guanwan cause unpleasant rumors among students as the issues and gossip that is not clear where it came from originally. But Gina did not ignore the rumors that circulated was because Gina Gunawan considers that it is only a friend.

    But the more he did not ignore the rumors, gossip and more widespread as a result of rumors that Gunawan earned the nickname “uhuy”. For info, actually said “uhuy” be awarded as the third person singular pronoun for people who are more in the process PDKT.

    In Gina’s mind, he felt that Gunawan not have the heart to Gina because she sees in behavior Gunawan, who treats all women with the same behavior. One day Gina Gunawan invited to lunch when they sat together . in this condition becomes crisp. Gina finally began talks with pretending to borrow lecture notes.

    At the start of talks Gunawan talked about issues that chubby cheeks Gina. Due to hear statements Gunawan, who talked about the problem Gina, making Gina feel discouraged and offended. But when he saw Gunawan who inadvertently discuss the problem Gina felt guilty because it was offended.

    Then Gunawan want to say something to make the heart Gina curious. With Gina’s curiosity to know what to say by Gunawan, Gina waited. After a long wait with a sense of wonder and fantasy that makes Gina blushed. Where is the thinking part that talks are going to say is about feeling Gunawan Gunawan against Gina. However the thought Gina was contrary to what you want in expressed by Gunawan. It turns out unexpectedly, Gunawan just want to borrow money to Gina because Gunawan was broken out.

    B. Analytical characterizations
    In this analysis are discussed in detail and characterizations Gina and Gunawan whereas other minor characters such as Rudi and Yanti.

    1. Gina
    In this story Gina described as a girl who has a problem with excessive weight, so he has always been a subject of ridicule my friend’s class. With the ridicule of his friends he often felt offended and discouraged. Character of Gina in this story is so confident with her body condition.

    2. Gunawan
    Gunawan was a boy who can socialize well to all his friends. He is a friend of Gina who can accept what Gina is.

    3. Rudi
    In this story Rudi is described as an ordinary person. He is who Gina likes. He is also a good friend Gina who had been friends a long time with Gina.

    4. Yanti
    Yanti is Gina’s friends while he was in college. Jackie was a good person and that always makes the heart cheerful Gina happy.

    Conclusion
    Based on the results of the analysis the authors argue that Gina’s story is one that does not have a sense of confidence with her body shape. After we read this we can see the author wanted to convey that we should be confident with whatever our condition because in the eyes of God all the same.

  3. I. Introduction
    In literature we have known about the three kinds of fiction, they are novel,Folktale and short story. All of kinds of fiction are the imagination of the writer. The writer creates the atmosphere and builds the character of each person or things in the story so the reader will get fun in reading the fiction. When the reader begins to enjoy the story and the people sink in the condition and atmosphere in the story, the writer success in making and creating the fiction. The writer sometimes uses his own experience, observation and even his real life in making the story, sometimes the reader will feel that the story is real or even get close with the real life near the society. This kind of situation is really good because in short story and novel tell about some aspects in our surrounding society. It makes the reader of fiction is more than the reader of non-fiction. A fiction is a kind of expression that is related with the real life/ real experience of life but sometimes the reader face the difficulties in understanding the story. It makes the reader doesn’t know the real meaning that is delivered by the writer. It may be the minimal ability to analyze the fiction. Some of the readers only know some of the information and they don’t go through inside of the story to get the detailed meaning and the general meaning.This paper discusses about the characterization of short story “The Little Mermaid” there is a Life about finding yourself and learning more about who you are. Unfortunately, like most media outlets, most children movies do not point out the importance of being who you are. Little girls are not taught by the media to love themselves before they love someone else. This is why little girls grow up trying to find “Mr. Right” or their “Prince Charming” before they know who they are. They are taught to be what the other people in the world want them to be.

    A. Synopsis of the short story “ The Littlemermaid” by Christian Andersen’s
    In “ Littlemermaid” begins with the description of Sea where the Five characters live. Sea uses the place they lives of the story, as well as the six main characters’ reactions to their surroundings, to show how A girl . The story begins with Princess Ariel. After Ariel, a young mermaid who happens to be the daughter of Triton, the king of the oceans, sees and falls in love with a human being, Prince Eric, she makes a deal with the evil witch Ursula that allows her to become human herself, although without her beautiful voice and with the condition that, if she fails to win Eric’s heart within three days, she will become Ursula’s slave.
    Analysis :
    in fact, significantly different than that of its source, even though the narrative still concerns a young mermaid’s love for a mortal man.include numerous humorous touches, but it is also enlivened with a youthful vigor combining a rebellious but innocent love of life with an eager adventurousness. Unlike the fairy tale, there is little that is tragic in the story, though Ariel and those she loves do at times face terrible dangers and difficult, painful choices. These individuals are never daunted by their fears, however, and are always thrilled by the marvels with which the world presents them.
    Generally, this approach works well, even if it is not true to Andersen’s tale. Regrettably, this lightheartedness is on occasion taken too far. The Little Mermaid is, for example, filled with a plethora of adorable characters and saccharine moments. The excessively cute mannerisms and darling, childlike face or voice of one or another of these characters can be particularly grating. Fortunately, these are rarely so distracting that they prevent the story from being enjoyable.
    Actually, the story sweetness constitutes a large part of its appeal. Ariel, in particular, is always pleasant and endearing. She is headstrong in an entirely ingenuous sort of way, wonderfully vivacious, and burning with excitement. Even though her companions, Sebastian, a good-hearted, frequently vexed crab with a Caribbean accent who was sent by the king of the sea to watch over his daughter, and Flounder, a chubby, juvenile fish who is the heroine’s best friend, can be a little irritating, Ariel herself generally makes up for their shortcomings.
    • Analysis Major Characters from Disney’s The Little Mermaid
    1. Princess Ariel
    Ariel as a woman is only seen wearing a specific kind of clothing (in this instance, throughout the movie it was flowing dresses, and elaborate design), a girl learns this as a desirable trait, and despite her own comfort and her preferences, she will bend her personality to become this more desirable person, if just through the smallest societal standards. Likewise, when a boy observes the actions of Price Eric, or the mermen in the film, they learn a role in society that promotes the masculine, demotes the feminine (weak) traits, and rewards heterosexual and superior behavior.
    She was very soon arrayed in costly robes of silk and muslin, and was the most beautiful creature in the palace; but she was dumb, and could neither speak nor sing.

    2. Prince Eric
    Comparatively, the characters in the story that live “normal” heterosexual lives are portrayed as the happier, more social group. An example of this ideology in this movie would be the marriage of Prince Eric to Ariel. The happily-ever-after ending to this story is centered on the heterosexual relationship and the good it does for both cultures involved. I believe in the movies that follow this one, the characters even have children.

    3. Ursula
    The only character that even slightly falls out of the norm is Ursula, who represents the asexual in this case. Rather than taking on the traditional marriage and relationship with the opposite gender, Ursula ignores emotional connection and sexual need all together, but then again, it doesn’t last the entire film. As per Butler’s theory, Ursula is fighting against the norms of performativity set for her by society, and throughout the film, her rebellion is highlighted as a negative influence on her life and society as a whole. When the children see this, those who have any desire currently or in their future lives, to live outside of the given norm of society; they will learn that they will sacrifice most meaningful human contact and risk ostrasization.

    4. Sebastian

    He is as court musician in this story ,which Sebastian accidentally reveals the incident with Eric. He that the relationship between man and man banned mermaid,a funny and very accurate knowledge of human culture . and he is his best friend, he is kind always help Ariel when he needs.

    5. King Triton
    The Sea King had been a widower for many years, he is wise and emmotional in his characteristics. He is his father . he wore twelve oysters on her tail; while others, also of high rank, were only allowed to wear six. he was, however, deserving of very great praise, especially for her care of the little sea-princesses, her grand-daughters. They were six beautiful children; but the youngest was the prettiest of them all; her skin was as clear and delicate as a rose-leaf, and her eyes as blue as the deepest sea; but, like all the others, she had no feet, and her body ended in a fish’s tail.

    CONCLUSION

    Disney’s little mermaid is indeed a tale about America. Maybe it is because of the lack of “American fairy-tales” that Disney feels they have to make their own out of the old ones. The movies has a the troubled teenager and a single parent. There is also class and race struggle, as the little mermaid wants to be part of a world that she doesn’t’ belong to. And of course, the warring big businesses represented by the king of the sea, Triton, and the seawitch, Ursula. Their little mermaid is indeed an all-American tale.
    The anime version leaves the fairy-tale as it is. There is the romantic love story and the poor little mermaid who fails in her quest to gain the princes love. She goes through the trials and hardships that she must, a true heroine.

  4. YOUNG GOODMAN BROWN
    Written by Nathaniel Hawthorne

    • Introduction
    “Young Goodman Brown,” written in 1835 by Nathaniel Hawthorne is known for being one of literature’s most gripping portrayals of seventeenth-century Puritan society. The tale first appeared in the April issue of New England Magazine and was later included in Hawthorne’s popular short story collection, Mosses from an Old Manse, in 1846. Though a work of fiction, “Young Goodman Brown” is widely considered to be one of the most effective literary works to address the hysteria surrounding the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. Hawthorne is also remembered for helping to establish the short story as a respected form of literature and as a proponent of instilling morals and lessons into his writing.

    • Synopsys of Young Goodman Brown
    “Young Goodman Brown” tells the tale of a young Puritan man drawn into a covenant with the Devil. Brown’s illusions about the goodness of his society are crushed when he discovers that many of his fellow townspeople, including religious leaders and his wife, are attending a Black Mass. At the end of the story, it is not clear whether Brown’s experience was nightmare or reality, but the results are nonetheless the same. Brown is unable to forgive the possibility of evil in his loved ones and as a result spends the rest of his life in desperate loneliness and gloom.

    • Character Analyze
    1. Goodman Brown
    Goodman Brown shows both innocence and corruptibility as he vacillates between believing in the inherent goodness of the people around him and believing that the devil has taken over the minds of all the people he loves. At the beginning of the story, Goodman Brown believes in the goodness of his father and grandfather, until the old man, likely the devil, tells him that he knew them both. Goodman Brown believes in the Christian nature of Goody Cloyse, the minister, and Deacon Gookin, until the devil shows him that Goody Cloyse is a witch and the other two are his followers. Finally, he believes that Faith is pure and good, until the devil reveals at the ceremony that Faith, too, is corruptible. This vacillation reveals Goodman Brown’s lack of true religion—his belief is easy to shake—as well as of the good and evil sides of human nature. Through Goodman Brown’s awakening to the evil nature of those around him, Hawthorne comments on what he sees as the hidden corruption of Puritan society. Goodman Brown believes in the public professions of faith made by his father and the elders of his church and in the societal structures that are built upon that faith. Hawthorne suggests, however, that behind the public face of godliness, the Puritans’ actions were not always Christian. The devil in the story says that he was present when Brown’s father and grandfather whipped Quakers and set fire to Indian villages, making it clear that the story of the founding of New England has a dark side that religion fails to explain. The very fact that Goodman Brown is willing to visit the forest when he has an idea of what will happen there is an indication of the corruptibility and evil at the heart of even the most faithful Puritan.
    2. Faith
    Faith represents the stability of the home and the domestic sphere in the Puritan worldview. Faith, as her name suggests, appears to be the most pure-hearted person in the story and serves as a stand-in of sorts for all religious feeling. Goodman Brown clings to her when he questions the goodness of the people around him, assuring himself that if Faith remains godly, then his own faith is worth fighting temptation to maintain. When he sees that Faith has been corrupted, he believes in the absolute evil at the heart of man. His estrangement from Faith at the end of the story is the worst consequence of his change of heart. If he is able to be suspicious of Faith, Hawthorne suggests, then he has truly become estranged from the goodness of God.
    3. The Old Man/Devil
    In “Young Goodman Brown,” the devil appears to be an ordinary man, which suggests that every person, including Goodman Brown, has the capacity for evil. When the devil appears to Goodman Brown in the forest, he wears decent clothes and appears to be like any other man in Salem Village, but Goodman Brown learns that the devil can appear in any context and not appear out of place. By emphasizing the devil’s chameleon nature, Hawthorne suggests that the devil is simply an embodiment of all of the worst parts of man. By saying that the devil looks as though he could be Goodman Brown’s father, Hawthorne creates a link between them, raising the questions of whether the devil and Goodman Brown might be related or the devil might be an embodiment of Goodman Brown’s dark side. Later in the story, Goodman Brown, flying along with the devil’s staff on his way to the ceremony, appears to be a much more frightening apparition than any devil could be by himself. Although it is never fully clear whether the old man and Goodman Brown’s experiences in the forest were a dream or reality, the consequences of Goodman Brown’s interaction with the old man stay with him for the rest of his life.

    • Conclusion
    The conclusion of this story then begins when he suddenly finds himself alone in the forest, as if he has just awakened from a dream. What he experienced in the forest – whether dream or reality – changes his life. He is now suspicious of everyone, just as the Puritans of real-life Salem were when they participated in a witch hunt that resulted in the execution. After the incident Young Goodman Brown was never the same again, he was one who liked to be sad when he had it firmly, like the gloomy solitude, a desperate man “. Finally, in this story he died (Young Goodman Brown) leaving his wife and family.

  5. Sir I want to change this story become “A couple’s dream”

    Analysis of the main character in the story “a couple’s dream”
    By: Adhi Karya

    Introduction
    As literature, Fiction, (novel, novelette, short stories), is the result of the author’s imagination. The short story is usually made from life experiences or events experienced by the author.
    Although fiction is an attempt to express the experience of life, they often have difficulty understanding that in reading fiction. As a result, the messages conveyed by the author are not understood completely. These capabilities also occur due to lack of the ability of readers to analyze the text.
    Analysis of these characterizations is one effort to assist the reader in understanding the short story in general and specifically. The discussion in this analysis focused on the main character.

    A. Synopsis novel
    Two childrens sitting on the class, along with another childrens, they want to drawing on A3 paper, entitled “My Dream “. Nusa and Rei a child attending kindergarten, they’re drawing ideals their dream. Rei drawing robot because he wants to be an engineer while Nusa have a dream to build a nice big house for father, grandmother, Nusa, and Rei can play together with the robots in the dream by Rei. Since that they become friend.

    Nusa and Rei graduated kindergarten together. Rei and Nusa continue to Senior high schools in the same school. Nusa’s father was a successful businessman. Nusa’s father had succeeded in developing a small shop, which he founded before Nusa was born into a large company that has many branches in different regions. Rei lives with his grandparents since childhood. Rei’s grandfather was a building contractor. Nusa and Rei are enjoying their adolescence. They meet, travel, and play freely like there is nothing that can hinder their joy.

    Nusa and Rei graduated High School together. Nusa and Rei continue their education to college the same country. Nusa majored in management at the suggestion of his father. Nusa is planned to be a substitute for his father at a later date. Nusa supports parents’ plans. Rei chose the architecture, different majors with Nusa. Rei is often argued with his grandfather about his duties. Rei was busy with college activities, while Nusa busy with the activities of organization in his campus.
    Nusa and Rei graduated from the university together. Nusa offered to continue his studies by his parents, but Nusa decided to look for work experience first. Nusa got a job as a marketer at an international bank. The work at the bank is the dream of many people. Work in air-conditioned office in the city center with facilities and a satisfactory salary. Rei got a scholarship to study abroad. Nusa provide support to Rei. At first, Nusa and Rei still reverberate e-mail each other. E-mail from Nusa contains a story about him and his friends, accomplishments achieved, until boredom at work. E-mail from Rei contains a story about him and his college friends, photographs of him, and words of encouragement for Nusa strands. Over time, the reply from Rei and Nusa was slowly. The phone also rarely returned. Their relations increasingly rare the gulf between them increasingly wide and deep.

    Two years later they were almost never communicate again. Nusa decided to quit her job and she applied to a famous private university abroad. Nusa think that higher education will make her better. Nusa choose the master management. Rei was already somewhere they have not been communicating. The next day head to the airport there Nusa and Rei met they discussing about their past when I was in junior kindergarten. Nusa remembered the picture of she and Rei create images to make a nice house for her father and her grandmather, while Nusa create images of robots. Rei into the architecture department of desire his own, while the entrance Nusa management majors of his own accord based on the advice his father.

    It was time to separte with Rei. Nusa hugged Rei for a while. Rei Nusa leaded to the departure gate. They split up again. Nusa leave Rei for her future, but this time Nusa said to himself that – it’s never too late to change.

    B. Analytical characterizations
    even though in “A couple’s dream” there are five figures are included in the main character are Nusa and Rei. Their presence greatly affects on this story. In this story the other characters such as Nusa, Nusa’s father, grandmother’s Nusa, Rei, and Rei’s grandparents is only a supporting actor. In the following analysis, in this analysis we discussed in detail only Nusa characterizations and Rei.

    1. Nusa
    At the beginning of the story, Nusa described as a good-hearted girl who has a dream to build a large and beautiful house for her father, and grandmother. Nusa has friend Named Rei their have been friends since they were on the kindergarten until now. While in college majoring in management Nusa pick up his father’s advice. Nusa is planned to be a substitute for his father at a later date. Nusa supports parents’ plans. After graduating from college Nusa searching her experiance by working until finally her job Nusa felt so bored and tired of her job. She think that higher education will make him better. When Nusa separte with Rei. Nusa said to himself that – it’s never too late to change. In this story the author uses Expository character.

    2. Rei
    Rei is described as young leaders proved wise when he had the ideals he continued his ideals. Since childhood, Rei make a robot. When he entered college majoring in architecture Rei choose, different majors with Nusa little friend sitting on a park bench when a child. Rei into the architecture department of his own desire, Rei lives with his grandparents since childhood. Rei’s grandfather was a building contractor. Rei got a scholarship to study abroad. In this story the author emphasizes that a resolute Rei.

    Conclusion
    Based on the results of the analysis conducted, the authors argue that the main character in “a couple’s dream” has a different character shown in figure Nusa and Rei. Nusa a girl who has aspirations to build a big house but have majored in management majors are required to by herfather. While Rei a resolute man he aspired to create a robot when he was continue in university as he majored in architecture. In this case I wanted to convey the message that if we have the ideals that we want as a child then we must try to make it happen. Until a later date we will not regret it.

  6. THE KING MIDAS AND THE GOLDEN TOUCH
    written by Upton Sinclair

    *INTRODUCTION

    As a work of literature, short stories is a result rather than an author’s imagination or thought. The content of a fiction usually the result of an observation or experience of the author. Even a short story is not simply the result of an imagination but also comes from a true story. Short stories are usually based on an experience or observation of even a true story written by authors, who in turn look more realistic and closer to the lives of its readers. The discussion is focused on the short story character analysis of the main character, and character of the entire discussion is done only based on the content of stories.

    *SYNOPSIS OF THE KING MIDAS AND THE GOLDEN TOUCH

    King Midas story about a king who is very rich compared with other kings. King Midas lived with his golden treasure so much. He was very fond of gold, even in the palace there is a fortress that is specific to save the gold. King Midas is very greedy, because he never had enough with the gold he had. Once, when King Midas was counting his gold came a fairy, and King Midas-gold also asked to be given more abundant again. He always wants more gold, even she thinks that happiness lies only in the gold it has, for King Midas and the gold is the most beautiful thing in this world. Even gold is much more important than his son, Marygold. While, the fairies granted his request to give more gold, then anything that King Midas touched directly will definitely turn into gold. To ensure the appointment of the fairies, he touched upon awakening whatever is around him, and magical items whatever it touches turns to gold. King Midas is very happy about it. But after a while he found it difficult because, food and drink turned into solid gold, even his son Marygold turned into a golden statue. With feelings of sadness and regret he continues to call fairies to restore the situation as before, especially her little daughter who had been let. King Midas finally realize that true happiness lies not in the number of gold he had.

    *CHARACTER ANALYZE (King Midas)

    The characterization of the King Midas used the expository and dramatic method to describe the King Midas. In this story the King Midas is the greedy man and ungrateful man for what he had (like the King’s said) :

    “”As you see, I have this room full of gold, but I should like much more; for gold is the best and the most wonderful thing in the world.”

    “If I could have but one wish,” said the King, “I would ask that everything I touch should turn to beautiful yellow gold.”

    In general, the King Midas and the Golden Touch story reveals the life of King Midas who always wanted to get a lot of gold. King Midas interest in gold, making him forget the life around it. King Midas has more importance than any gold, including his son, Marygold. With greed and lack of gratitude, he hoped whatever it touches or anything around it can be turned into gold. King Midas think gold is the most beautiful and most important in his life, and assume that true happiness is in the gold he had. But in the end, because his desire is so strong in gold brings him in a loneliness, sadness and destruction. King Midas gets a chance to turn everything into gold with just a touch, and he was so happy. Until the end, he can not eat and drink because all into gold, and with feelings of sadness he saw his daughter also turned into a golden statue. King Midas characters in this story looks so interested in gold, which makes him a greedy and there is no gratitude. In this story of King Midas must feel sorrow only because of the desire and greed.

    *CONCLUSION

    Based on the results of character analysis is done, I would argue that in the King Midas and the Golden Touch, Sinclair was able to describe the character of King Midas, the greedy, no sense of gratitude, not caring for others, and considered a treasure far more important than anything which is able to brings the reader to imagine the real life. The main factors that indicate success in mengahadirkan Sinclair King Midas greed is the number of plot lines that show the desire of King Midas gold.

    The success of King Midas Sinclair described the figures can not be separated in two respects. First, apply the depiction of character in Sinclair expository method. Second, the sentences used in this story is relatively simple and easy to understand readers.

    The use of expository and dramatic methods in describing the character King Midas greatly assist readers in knowing the character of King Midas. In the expository method the authors describe the behavior of King Midas with very clear. The use of dramatic methods in this story are seen in action, speech, and mind of the protagonist King Midas.

    With the various actions and utterances of King Midas, authors were able to convey a moral message for the readers. Where from this story, the writer said that we should not become a human being greedy, always want the more things without words of gratitude, should care for one another, and never assume that an abundance of gold and treasure the truth does not guarantee happiness . For that story of the King Midas and the Golden Touch is worth reading, because it provides a variety of good moral messages through the character of King Midas.

  7. Theme “HARD TIME”
    by: Charles Dickens
    Surveillance and Knowledge
    One of themes are surveillance and knowledge. As is the case in other novels by the author, there are characters who spend time keeping secrets and hiding their history and there is another set of characters who devote themselves to researching, analyzing and listening in on the lives of others. Mrs. Sparsit and Mr. Gradgrind are both masters of surveillance but Sparsit is more gossipy while Gradgrind is more scientific. Another operator to consider is James Harthouse who devotes himself to the task of understanding and “knowing” Louisa. From all three of these characters we get the idea that knowledge of another person is a form of mastery and power over them. Besides Louisa, Josiah Bounderby is another victim of surveillance. Without knowing what she has done, Mrs. Sparsit manages to uncover the secret of Bounderby’s upbringing and his foul lies about being a self-made man.
    The Opposition Between Fact and Fancy
    While Mr. Gradgrind insists that his children should always stick to the facts, Hard Times not only suggests that fancy is as important as fact, but it continually calls into question the difference between fact and fancy. Dickens suggests that what constitutes so-called fact is a matter of perspective or opinion. For example, Bounderby believes that factory employees are lazy good-for-nothings who expect to be fed “from a golden spoon.” The Hands, in contrast, see themselves as hardworking and as unfairly exploited by their employers. These sets of facts cannot be reconciled because they depend upon perspective. While Bounderby declares that “[w]hat is called Taste is only another name for Fact,” Dickens implies that fact is a question of taste or personal belief. As a novelist, Dickens is naturally interested in illustrating that fiction cannot be excluded from a fact-filled, mechanical society. Gradgrind’s children, however, grow up in an environment where all flights of fancy are discouraged, and they end up with serious social dysfunctions as a result. Tom becomes a hedonist who has little regard for others, while Louisa remains unable to connect with others even though she has the desire to do so. On the other hand, Sissy, who grew up with the circus, constantly indulges in the fancy forbidden to the Gradgrinds, and lovingly raises Louisa and Tom’s sister in a way more complete than the upbringing of either of the older siblings. Just as fiction cannot be excluded from fact, fact is also necessary for a balanced life. If Gradgrind had not adopted her, Sissy would have no guidance, and her future might be precarious. As a result, the youngest Gradgrind daughter, raised both by the factual Gradgrind and the fanciful Sissy, represents the best of both worlds.
    Fidelity
    The theme of fidelity touches upon the conflicts of personal interest, honesty and loyalty that occur throughout the novel. Certainly, characters like Josiah Bounderby and James Harthouse seem to be regularly dishonest while Louisa Gradgrind and Sissy Jupe hold fast to their obligations and beliefs. In Louisa’s case, her fidelity is exemplified in her refusal to violate her marital vows despite her displeasure with her husband. Sissy’s exemplifies fidelity in her devotion to the Gradgrind family and perhaps even more remarkably, in her steadfast belief that her father is going to return for her seeking “the nine oils” that she has preserved for him.

    Escape
    The theme of escape really underscores the difference between the lives of the wealthy and the lives of the poor. In Stephen Blackpool, we find a decent man who seeks to escape from his failed marriage but he cannot even escape into his dreams for peace. On the other hand, we find Tom Gradgrind who indulges in gambling, alcohol and smoking as “escapes” from his humdrum existence. And after he commits a crime, his father helps him to escape through Liverpool. Again, Louisa Gradgrind desires a similar escape from the grind of the Gradgrind system, though she resorts to imagined pictures in the fire rather than a life of petty crime. Finally, “Jem” Harthouse rounds out the options available to the nobility. With all of his life dedicated to leisure, even his work assignment is a sort of past-time from which he easily escapes when the situation has lost its luster.

  8. Character analysis of “A Man Who Had No Eyes”
    By MacKinlay Kantor
    Introduction
    In literature we have known about the three kinds of fiction, they are novel and short story. All of kinds of fiction are the imagination of the writer. The writer creates the atmosphere and builds the character of each person or things in the story so the reader will get fun in reading the fiction. When the reader begins to enjoy the story and the people sink in the condition and atmosphere in the story, the writer success in making and creating the fiction.
    The writer sometimes uses his own experience, observation and even his real life in making the story, sometimes the reader will feel that the story is real or even get close with the real life near the society. This kind of situation is really good because in short story and novel tell about some aspects in our surrounding society. It makes the reader of fiction is more than the reader of non-fiction. A fiction is a kind of expression that is related with the real life/ real experience of life but sometimes the reader face the difficulties in understanding the story. It makes the reader doesn’t know the real meaning that is delivered by the writer. It may be the minimal ability to analyze the fiction. Some of the readers only know some of the information and they don’t go through inside of the story to get the detailed meaning and the general meaning.
    This paper discusses about the characterization of short story “A Man Who Had No Eyes by MacKinlay Kanton.”There is no blindness but the blindness of the heart.”MacKinlay Kantor illustrates the truth of this proverb in the short story, “A Man Who Had No Eyes.” MacKinlay Kantor (February 4, 1904 – October 11, 1977),[1] born Benjamin McKinlay Kantor, was an American journalist, novelist and screenwriter. He wrote more than 30 novels, several based on the American Civil War, and won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1956 for his 1955 novel Andersonville, about the Confederate prisoner of war camp. (The novel is often erroneously believed to have been the basis for the stage play and TV movie The Andersonville Trial (1970), as well as for the TV mini-series Andersonville (1995), but neither have any actual connection to Kantor’s work.
    Through the use of mood, point of view, and characterization, Kantor shows that there is something worse than physical blindness–blindness of the heart. The language of the descriptive passages is direct, clear and easy to under¬stand. The sentences are short with no comparisons, metaphors or other stylistic devices. The language of the dialogues is different, depending on who is speaking: slangy, uneducated and emotional when the beggar speaks; grammatically correct, precise language for Mr. Parsons. This paper is made as the mid term assignment for Literature II and the sources and also to get the information using the approachment that is learnt in Literature.

    Analysis
    A. Synopsis of the short story “A Man Who Had No Eyes”
    In “A man who had No Eyes” begins with the description of city where the two characters live. Kantor uses the mood of the story, as well as the two main characters’ reactions to their surroundings, to show how Markwardt is blinded by self-absorption. The story begins with a cheerful mood and the depiction of a bright, clear day. The air is “rich with spring,” which makes Parsons realize he is glad to be alive. Parsons is very aware of his surroundings, which “thrill him with eagerness.” Parsons’ enjoyment of his environment helps create the pleasant, positive mood. However, after Markwardt asks Parsons for money and tells his dramatic, false story, the mood changes. The spring wind becomes “damp and quivering.” Markwardt, however, seems to be oblivious to the world around him. He is completely focused on milking as much money as possible out of Parsons. The upbeat mood at the beginning of the story reflects Parsons’s positive outlook on life. However, after Markwardt tells his “bitter and studied drama,” the mood changes for the worse, and this, as well as Markwardt’s inattention to his surroundings, reveals his self-absorption and selfishness.
    There are two characters, a blind beggar and Mr. Parsons. The latter is a successful man walking down a street when he’s stopped by the beggar. The beggar claims not to be a beggar and tries to sell a lighter to Mr. Parsons. He pities the blind beggar and gives him money. Being an opportunist, he tries to get more money and launches into a sob story about how he became blind. Mr. Parsons surprises him by saying that the story isn’t entirely true.

    B. Characters Analyze
    1. Mr. Parsons
    Kantor uses the mood of the story, as well as the two main characters’ reactions to their surroundings, to show how Markwardt is blinded by self-absorption. The story begins with a cheerful mood and the depiction of a bright, clear day. The air is “rich with spring,” which makes Parsons realize he is glad to be alive. Parsons is very aware of his surroundings, which “thrill him with eagerness.” Parsons’ enjoyment of his environment helps create the pleasant, positive mood. Parsons’s clothing, history, and speech show that he is confident and self-respecting. He is dressed in a clean, gray suit and hat, and readers learn that he has worked hard to become a successful businessman. Parsons also speaks with confidence and authority. He says to Markwardt, “It’s late. I have an appointment. Do you want me to give you something?” ( p: 57)Mr. Parsons is mainly calm and subdued with dealing with the beggar, where he is persuaded to buy the lighter. Mr. Parsons is simply intent of helping another blind soul, because he “felt a sudden and foolish pity for all blind creatures.” His attitude turns cold once Markwardz‘s false story is revealed.( http://bookstove.com/book-talk/the-man-who-had-no-eyes/#ixzz1d6tD0q3z)
    Mr. Parsons is blind also, he is known throughout the story as a “successful, respected, admired man, who is short but also handsome.” Mr. Parsons is better dressed because he is clad in “immaculate” clothes. Now he was successful, respected, admired …. (p:57) Mr. Parsons is naturally embarrassed for being seen with the blind beggar, even if he is blind also.

    2. Markdwardt
    Markwardt asks Parsons for money and tells his dramatic, false story, the mood changes. The spring wind becomes “damp and quivering.” Markwardt, however, seems to be oblivious to the world around him. He is completely focused on milking as much money as possible out of Parsons. The upbeat mood at the beginning of the story reflects Parsons’s positive outlook on life. However, after Markwardt tells his “bitter and studied drama,” the mood changes for the worse, and this, as well as Markwardt’s inattention to his surroundings, reveals his self-absorption and selfishness but selfish and heartless.
    Even though both men are blind, one has lost another kind of vision as well. Mr.Markwardt has lost the vision of his driving force and possibly the vision of sanity. Mr.Markwardt lived a life of lying, knowing that he did and atrocious act in the act of running away from a factory, but he never thought he would meet the man who he engaged. What has kept Mr. Markwardt alive and going is now gone, as his story is false. He will live the rest of his life knowing that what he did hurt him more and the man he pushed away is successful and he is poor.”You want to know how I lost my eyes? Well here it is ….. (p:58). Markwardt is a minor character. he is a blind beggar that’s sort of chubby, wears greasy clothes, and had a black sack slung over his shoulder. He sells cigarette lighters and tells people how he lost his vision for money. His story about losing his vision is the other way around; he just tells it dishonestly so that people will feel pity and give him money.
    C. Conclusion
    One of the most compelling examples of Markwardt’s blindness of the heart can be seen from Kantor’s characterization of Parsons and Markwardt. In contrast, Markwardt is described as wearing a greasy coat and carrying a “battered cane.” Although he sells cheap cigarette lighters, it is clear, despite Markwardt’s protests to the contrary, that he is indeed begging. After Parsons has paid for the lighter, Markwardt insists on telling his pitiful story. At this point Kantor shows just how pathetic Markwardt is: Kantor reveals that Markwardt himself is the reason why Parsons is blind. Clearly, Parsons is much better off than Markwardt, though, because although Parsons is sightless, he, unlike Markwardt, is not self-absorbed and pitying. Parsons is able to enjoy life and give to others, while Markwardt is a wheedling, grasping man who is not only sightless. When I read this, I was paying close attention to details and literary devices. I enjoyed the subtle amount of foreshadowing. It was written in 3rd person to give an outsiders’ view. There was quite a contrast between the two characters, aside from the obvious social class differences. Their personalities are opposite; Mr. Parsons doesn’t let his handicaps deter him, and worked hard for his position. The beggar uses his dramatic story to get money. There was a twist at the end, like a punch line, that gives a fitting end for the story and ties together all the hints.

  9. CHARACTERIZATIONS IN “THE GRAPES OF WRATH “BY JOHN STEINBECK

    Introduction

    Similar to other types of literature, fiction (novel, novella, short stories), is processed by the author’s imagination. The material of a fiction is usually based on experience or observation the author of life. Even some novel or short story inspired by a true story. But the material is not presented exactly with the underlying reality. In the process of the creation story, the author chose and modifies the material in accordance with its objectives.

    Given that the story in a fiction based on experience or observations made on the author’s life or a true story, fiction seem more realistic or close to real life, making it more familiar to the public or the readers. The impression is quite impressive, since both short stories and novels in general talks about certain aspects that are prevalent in the lives of ordinary people. Therefore, it is natural that interest in fiction is much better than lovers of poetry or drama.

    Although fiction is a re-disclosure of business life experience (which may not be much different from the reality facing), they often have difficulty understanding the fiction that is read. As a result, human values and artistic delivered authors often can not be understood completely.

    This paper is one effort to help community members appreciate the short story in general and the short story The Grapes of Wrath specifically. Authors were interested to analyze this short story for the author; John Steinbeck is considered one of the novelists who were awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the Nobel Prize. Simple writing style makes his works, which generally presents a universal theme, easy to understand.

    The Grapes of Wrath is a novel published in 1939 and written by John Steinbeck, who was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1940 and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962. Set during the Great Depression, this novel focuses on the Joads, a poor family of sharecroppers driven from their Oklahoma home by drought, economic hardship, and changes in the financial industry and agriculture. Because they are almost desperate situation, and partly because they are stuck in the Dust Bowl, the Joads leave for California. Along with thousands of other “Okies”, they look for jobs, land, dignity and future.

    The Grapes of Wrath is often read in American high school and college literature classes because of the context of the history and lasting legacy. A celebrated Hollywood film version, starring Henry Fonda and directed by John Ford, made in 1940.

    The discussion in this paper focuses on aspects of characterizations. Analyzes were performed using a purely structural approach, because the entire discussion is done only based on the content of stories. And given that this paper is intended as an example of analysis in Literature class II presentation of analysis results to be pursued by using the rules of academic writing.

    Analysis

    A. Synopsis
    The Grapes of Wrath

    Novels of John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath tells the story of the Joad family that illustrates how the difficulties and oppression suffered by migrant laborers during the Great Depression. This is explicitly political tract that champions collective action by the lower classes over expressions of individualist self-interest and chastises corporate and banking elites for shortsighted policies meant to maximize profits even while forcing farmers into destitution and even starvation.

    This novel begins with a description of conditions in the Oklahoma Dust Bowl that damage crops and instigated massive foreclosures on farmland. There is no particular character appears at first, a technique that Steinbeck would return to several times in this book, juxtaposing descriptions of events in the larger social context with a more specific to the Joad.

    Tom Joad, a man not yet thirty, dressed in a clean approach to a restaurant, rather formal clothing. He boarded a truck driver at the restaurant, which presses Tom for information until Tom finally reveals that he had just been released from McAlester prison, where he served four years for murdering a man during a fight.

    On the way home, Tom met with a former priest, Jim Casy, a talkative man gripped by doubts about the teachings of religion and the presence of sin. He gave up the service after realizing that he found little wrong with sexual liaisons with women who have been in the congregation. Casy support the view that what is sacred in human nature comes not from a distant god, but from the people themselves. Steinbeck contrasts Tom returned with the arrival of the bank representatives to expel tenant farmers and tractors for agricultural land. He increases the chances of working class revolt, but can not find an effective target for collective action.

    When Tom and Casy reach the Joad house, it was empty. Muley Graves, a local elderly man who may not be sane, informed them that the Joads have been evicted, and now living with Uncle John. Muley his own family had left to seek work in California, but Muley decided to live alone. That night, because they violate the property now owned by banks, three are forced to hide from the police who might catch them.

    Steinbeck follows this with a description of the tactics used by car dealers to exploit the poor customer. They find that they can make larger profits by selling damaged jalopies than by selling a new car reliable.

    Tom Joad fined family members who lived with Uncle John, a moody man prone to depression after the death of his wife several years earlier. His mother was a strong woman who is a strong moral center of family life. His brother, Noah, may have been brain damaged at birth, while her sister, Rose of Sharon (called Rosasharn by the family) recently got married and pregnant. Her husband, Connie Rivers, has a dream to learn radio. Tom’s younger brother, Al, only sixteen and had concerns that the appropriate age. This is followed by a more general description of the sale of goods by poor families who intend to leave Oklahoma for California, as the Joads expect to do.

    The Joads are planning to go to California based on the flayers they found advertising work in the fields there. This leaflet, like Steinbeck will soon reveal, is fraudulent advertising intended to attract more workers than needed and lowered wages. Jim Casy asks to accompany the Joads to California so he can work with people in the field rather than preach at them. Before the family leaves, Grandpa Joad refuses to go, but the family of drugs that knocked him unconscious and took him with them. The following chapters describe the empty houses that remain after the Oklahoma farmers leaving for work elsewhere, as well as conditions on Route 66, the highway that stretches from Oklahoma to Bakersfield, California.

    Almost immediately into the trip, losing two members of the Joad family. The first victim was a family dog, who runs more than during their first stop. The second is Grandpa Joad, who died of a stroke. Wilson helped Joads family when my grandfather died, and the two families decide to travel to California together. Steinbeck follows this with a larger statement about the growth of collective consciousness among the working class, which change their perception of the “I” to “us.”

    Wilson immediately broken car, and Tom and Casy consider separating from the rest of the family temporarily to fix the car, but Ma Joad refuses to let the family break even temporarily. Tom and Al did find parts needed to fix the car at the junkyard, where the one-eyed man who oversaw the junkyard complains about his boss and threatened to kill him. Before the Joads begin their journey again, they found a man who returned from California who told them that there are no jobs there, and promises to work on the flayer fraud.

    The Joads and Wilsons reach California, where they soon were intimidated by police officers who mocked them and other migrants “Okies.” In the first camp in which they live, Grandma becomes very ill, but received some comfort from the only disturbing propaganda Jehovites Ma Joad. The police forced them out of the camp, but the Wilsons choose the possibility of catching the contrary, since Sairy Wilson is too ill to continue. The next time that the police stop the Joads on their travels, Ma Joad forces them to let them pass without inspection. He did this to hide from police the fact that my grandmother had died.

    Steinbeck follows this with a description of the history of California, who as one of the frames marked by oppression and slavery. However, he predicts a near revolution, for the people there have lost big in such a way that they should take what they need to survive.

    In the next camp where the Joads continue on their quest for work, they learn about Weed patch, a government camp where residents do not face harassment by police officers and have access to facilities including shower and toilet. When the police more trying to start a fight with Tom and several other migrant workers, Tom trips and Casy knocks him unconscious. To prevent Tom from taking the blame, because he would be sent back to prison for violating his parole, Casy accepts responsibility for the crime and taken to jail. The rest of the family began to break as well. Uncle John leaves to get drunk, Noah decides to leave the community altogether and lived alone in the woods, and Connie leave his pregnant wife. Before they had to move, Tom did not take Uncle John, who is still consumed with guilt over the death of his wife. They head north toward the government camp.

    At the government camp, the Joads were surprised to discover how other people treat them well and how efficiently these communities where camp leaders elected by the population function. Tom even gets a job the next day, but the contractor, Mr. Thomas, warned that there will be problems in dance at Weed patch that weekend. Because the police can only enter the camp if there is a problem, they intend to plant intruders there who would incite violence.

    The Joads settle into a comfortable existence in the government camp, and during the dance that Saturday, Tom and several other residents defuse the situation, preventing the police from taking control of the camp. However, after a month of weed patch none of the Joads have found steady job and realize that they must continue their journey. They arrived at the Hooper Ranch, where the entire family took a peach. Wages they receive higher than normal, because they violate the strike. Tom found that the leaders of the organized labor force strike Jim Casy. After his time in prison, Casy realized that he had to fight for collective action by the working class against the wealthy ruling class. Tom, Casy and other strike leaders get into a fight with strike breakers and one of them murders Casy with a pick handle. Tom struggles with the man and wrests away the weapon. He, in turn, kills the person who killed Casy, and barely escaped arrest by the police.

    Although Tom wanted to leave the family to save them from taking responsibility for him, the Joads decide to leave Hooper Ranch to the location where Tom can be safe. They reach cotton fields to the north, where Tom hid in the woods while families remain in the box car. Although his family tried to keep Tom’s identity and location secret, young Ruthie Winfield reveals during a fight with another child. When Ma told Tom about it, he decided to leave his family and went alone, determined to fight to find the cause of which Casy died, and vowed to return to his family one day.

    The rainy season arrived shortly after Tom left the family, there was a big flood. The Joads are stuck in a dangerous situation: they can not escape flooding because Rose of Sharon’s sudden entry into the workforce. While other families evacuate the camp near the river rapid ride, the Joads remain and attempt to stop the flood. Without the help of others, then the Joads do not succeed, and they must seek refuge on top of their car. Rose of Sharon gives a stillborn child that Uncle John sent in a box under the river. The family eventually reached higher ground and fined a barn for shelter. Inside the barn is a starving man and his son. Steinbeck’s novel ends with Rose of Sharon, almost recovered from delivery, nursing a dying man to nurse him back to health.

    B. Analysis of Major Characters

    1. Tom Joad
    A person who is the protagonist in this story; Joad family’s second son, named after his father. Later, Tom took the leadership of the family even though he was young. Four years in prison, he claimed, had formed itself into a person who devotes time and energy for the moment. The future, which seems illusory and out of range, does not concern him. He adopted this philosophy to life not because he was selfish but as a means to overcome: he was afraid that by putting his life in a context larger than today, he will drive himself mad with rage and helplessness. Of course, Tom, who shows a rare strength, attention, and moral certainty, is destined for more than a day to day life. Tom experienced the most significant transformation in the novel as she spread this carpe diem (seize the day) philosophy of commitment to improve the future.

    During their journey west, Tom reluctantly assumes the role of Jim Casy’s disciple. Former preacher emphasized that a person, when acting alone, can have little effect on the world, and that one can achieve wholeness only by devoting themselves to fellow human beings. Difficulties and hostility faced by the Joad family on their way west function to convert Tom to Casy’s teachings. By the time Tom and Casy unite in a cotton plantation, Tom realizes that he can not stand as silent witness to the injustices of the world; it can not work for the welfare of his own family if it means taking the bread from other families. On the plantation, Tom left the life of the structure of personal thought life some men this novel the characters-including Pa Joad and Uncle John, and set in a public act.

    2. Ma Joad
    A person who matriarch, matriarch is a society where women, especially mothers, have a central role of political leadership and moral authority. He tried to hold the family together. His name was given not been studied; suggested that her maiden name is Hazlett. A determined and loving woman, Ma Joad family emerged as the central force for the novel as Pa Joad gradually becomes less effective as a leader and provider. Regardless of how bleak the situation becomes, Ma Joad meets every obstacle without complaining. Ma displays surprising capacity to keep him together and to keep the family together in the face of great turmoil. He may exhibit this faculty the best for families from across the California desert. Here, Ma suffers privately with the knowledge that my grandmother is dead; go up quietly beside his corpse so that families can complete the dangerous journey. At the end of the episode, Ma calm exterior cracks just a little: he warns Tom not to touch it, saying that he could maintain peace only as long as he does not reach her. The ability to act decisively, and act for the good of his own family, enabling Ma led the Joads when Pa started to waver and hesitate. Although he continued grief for himself, he is not an advocate of solitude. He has consistently proven to be a supporter of the strongest novels of family and togetherness. Indeed, two trends are not in conflict but met in a philosophy of selfless sacrifice. Ma is the best articulated, perhaps, when he was without words directs his daughter to breast-feed the starving people in Chapter 30. With its resilient nature, Ma Joad shows that even the direst circumstances can be weathered with grace and dignity.

    3. Pa Joad
    Pa Joad 50-year-old is head of household is a good, wise, and she plans a family trip to California with care and consideration. The difficulties faced by the Joads prove too big for him, however, and although he worked hard to maintain his role as head of the family, he complained of chaotic thoughts and finds himself in quandaries often. Until the end, Pa exhibits a commitment to protect his family. His determination to try to build the dam is a testament to move into love and oneness purposes. When business starts to fall short, however, Pa despairs. In California, the inability to find work forced him to retreat helplessly into his own mind. As a result, it becomes less effective in his role as leader of the family, and Ma show this directly. After leaving the Weed patch camp, he dared to criticize him for losing sight of its responsibility to support the family. At the end of the novel, much diminished by the efforts failed to prevent the family from the flood shelters, he follows Ma blind and helpless as a child. Details of phased Pa serves as a sharp reminder that the difficulties are not always Despite the challenges of traveling Joads’ serves to strengthen Ma, Tom, and even the Rose of Sharon “build character.”, They weaken and eventually crippling Pa.

    4. Grandpa and Grandma Joad
    Grandpa Tom Joad is a grandfather who expressed a strong desire to live in Oklahoma. His full name is “William James Joad”. Grandfather who was drugged by her family with “soothin ‘syrup” to force him to leave, but died on the first night on the road; Casy attribute his death stroke, but also said the grandfather who “only” will stay with Ian “He. Can not leave. ”

    Grandma Joad is Grandpa Joad religious wife, he seemed to lose the will to live (and consequently dies while crossing the desert, possibly as a result of heat exposure while crossing New Mexico and Arizona) after the death of her husband.
    Grandpa and Grandma are clearly delineated. Grandpa has rebuttal complaining, mischievous, laughing face. “He fought and argued, telling stories that are not good (dirty). He is the same as usual. Vicious depraved and cruel and impatient, like a frantic child, and the whole structure of the overlay with amusement.”

    Grandfather maintains its position as titular head of the family, but no longer makes any decisions. When gathered around the truck Joads in a family council to decide on when to go to California, my grandfather has the right to make the first comment. He has a strong affection for Granma, but he is the glory himself in provoking him. Like Grandma is fierce religion, he derives immense pleasure in talking about his past adventures. Grandpa refused to leave the land, who settled, and when it came time to leave, he must be sedated and physically taken to the truck. But he belongs to the ground and dies on the first night of the trip. He was buried beside the road in Oklahoma.

    My grandmother had endured “only because he was as mean as her husband He has held his own with religiosity, pitched it as depraved and ferocious as wild as what Grandfather can offer.” Grandma strong in his conviction. He asks Casy to say grace before breakfast and ordered him to pray when my grandfather was dying. His life lost its meaning with the death of my grandfather, and he died soon after his death. Ma regretted that both the Grandfather and Grandmother survived to see the fertile valleys of California. Tom was right to feel that they were too advanced in age to face each new experience.

    5. Uncle John
    Uncle John is a man who rarely speaks during the novel. He suffered from guilt complexes have sinned and caused the death of his wife. When his wife was pregnant she developed abdominal pain and ask a doctor. Uncle John, however, said that he may have ate too much and the pain caused by indigestion. His wife died in the afternoon the next day from a ruptured appendix. When the error becomes too large, he fell in drink and sex to lighten his load. His character is clearly not strong, but he worried whether his sins had brought misfortune upon the Joad manifold. In the final chapter of this novel, he floats downstream Rose of Sharon’s baby born in a fit of anger; he hopes someone will find the lifeless form and understand the cruelty suffered by migrants.

    6. Jim Casy
    Jim Casy is a former preacher who lost his faith after committing adultery with volunteer members of his church several times, and from the perception that religion has no solace or answers to the difficulties people are experiencing. He was a portrait of himself as a Christ-like figure and is based on Ed Ricketts. The former minister who changed the concept of holiness, show that the most divine aspect of human experience is to be found on earth, among men, not in the clouds. As a radical philosopher, motivator and unifier of man, and martyrs, Casy assumes a role similar to Jesus Christ, with whom he also shares his initials. Casy begins the novel sure how to use his talents as a speaker and spiritual healer, if not as leaders of religious congregations. At the end of the novel, she has learned to apply them to task organize migrant workers. Indeed, Casy comes to believe so strongly in his mission to rescue workers suffering that he willingly gave his life for it. Casy teachings that ask the most dramatic development of character in this novel, by catalyzing the transformation of Tom Joad into a social activist and ordinary people.

    7. Rose of Sharon
    Rose of Sharon is a teenage daughter childish and daydreaming (which was about 16 or 17 years old) which develops into an adult woman. She symbolizes regrowth when she helps the starving stranger (see also Roman Charity, works of art based on the legend of a daughter as wet nurse to his father dying). Pregnant at the beginning of the novel, she gives birth to death, probably as a result of malnutrition. His name is pronounced “Rosasharn” by the family.

    Rose of Sharon’s character, that her pregnancy has transformed itself from “hoyden”-a high-spirited and saucy girl-a secret and mysterious woman. Rose of Sharon’s role in this novel is a dramatic role he played at the end of the novel. When she meets the hungry in the barn, he became a saint, another world. Its capacity to sustain life, paired with suffering and sorrow for the dead child, likened him to the Virgin Mary and suggest that there is hope to be found even in the bleakest circumstances.

    8. Al Joad
    Al Joad is the brother of Tom, who was sixteen years old. He felt responsible for the Hudson that the Joads buy and told Tom it was part of his soul. Al admires Tom and uses the fame of his brother for the negative things that is gaining popularity. Since the beginning of the novel, he wanted to leave families and jobs in the garage. At the end of this novel, he announced his decision to leave his family and stayed back with Agnes Wainwright, who proposed to marry the girl. He meets a small role in this novel.

    Conclusion
    Overall, the element characterizations in “The Grapes of Wrath” by John Steinbeck tells the story of the Joad family that illustrates how the difficulties and oppression suffered by migrant laborers during the Great Depression.
    An interesting thing in this story is the fact that the toms, the second of ma and pa Joad, Tom took the leadership of the family even though he was young. He helped and protects his family from any family difficulties. But unfortunately his brother by the name of al the good name of Tom Joad used to gain popularity.

  10. CHARACTERIZATIONS IN “ OF MICE AND MEN” BY JOHN STEINBECK.

    INTRODUCTION

    Similar to other types of literature, fiction (novel, novella, short stories), is processed by the author’s imagination. The material of a fiction is usually based on experience or observation the author of life. Even some novel or short story inspired by a true story. But the material is not presented exactly with the underlying reality. In the process of the creation story, the authors chose and modify the material in accordance with its objectives.

    Given that the story in fiction is based on experience and / or observations on the life of the author, or a true story, fiction seem more realistic or close to real life, making it more familiar to the public or readers. The impression is quite reasonable, since both short stories and novels in general talks about certain aspects commonly found in ordinary people’s lives. Therefore, it is natural that interest in fiction far more than the lovers of poetry or drama.

    Although fiction is a re-disclosure of business life experience (which may not be much different from the reality facing the reader), they often have difficulty understanding the fiction that is read. As a result, human values and artistic delivered authors often can not be understood completely. Most likely the difficulty was caused by a lack of ability among readers of literary analysis.

    This paper is one effort to assist community members in general to appreciate the novels, or stories of Mice and Men in particular. Authors were interested to analyze this story because its author, John Steinbeck, considered one of the most popular American novelists in 1929. He began writing novels in 1929, entitled “Cop of gold”.

    The discussion in this paper focuses on aspects of characterizations. Analyzes were performed using a purely structural approach, because the entire discussion is done only based on the content of the novel.

    ANALYSIS
    A. Synopsis of Mice and Men
    Two migrant field workers in California during the Great Depression—George Milton, an intelligent and cynical man, and Lennie Small, an ironically named man of large stature and immense strength but limited mental abilities—are on their way to a ranch near Soledad (southeast of Salinas, California) to “work up a stake.” They hope to one day attain their shared dream of settling down on their own piece of land. Lennie’s part of the dream is merely to tend to (and touch) soft rabbits on the farm. This dream is one of Lennie’s favorite stories, which George constantly retells. They are fleeing from their previous employment in Weed, California, where they were run out of town after Lennie’s love of stroking soft things resulted in an accusation of attempted rape when he touched a young woman’s dress. It soon becomes clear that the two are close friends and George is Lennie’s protector.

    At the ranch, the situation appears to be menacing and dangerous, especially when the pair is confronted by Curley—the boss’s small-statures aggressive son with an inferiority complex and who dislikes larger men—leaving the gentle giant Lennie potentially vulnerable. Curley’s flirtatious and provocative wife, to whom Lennie is instantly attracted, poses a problem as well. In sharp contrast to these two characters, the pair also meets Slim, the kind, intelligent and intuitive jerk line skinner who agrees to give Lennie one of the puppies his dog has recently given birth to, and another to an old ranch hand named Candy.

    Amazingly, and in spite of the potential problems on the ranch, their dream leaps towards reality when Candy, the aged, one-handed ranch-hand, offers to pitch in with George and Lennie so that they can buy a farm at the end of the month in return for permission to live with them on it. The trio is ecstatic, but their joy is overshadowed when Curley attacks Lennie and Lennie, urged on by George, catches his fist and crushes it, reminding the group there are still obstacles to overcome before their goal is reached.

    Nevertheless, George feels more relaxed, since the dream seems just within their grasp, to the extent that he even leaves Lennie behind on the ranch while he goes into town with the other ranch hands. Lennie wanders into the stable, and chats with Crooks, the bitter, yet educated stable buck, who is isolated from the other workers because he is black. Candy finds them and they discuss their plans for the farm with Crooks, who cannot resist asking them if he can hoe a garden patch on the farm, despite scorning the possibility of achieving the dream. Curley’s wife makes another appearance and flirts with the men, especially Lennie. However, her spiteful side is shown when she belittles them and is especially harsh towards Crooks because of his race.

    Lennie accidentally kills his puppy while stroking it. Curley’s wife enters and tries to speak to Lennie, admitting that she is lonely, how her dreams of becoming a movie star crashed, revealing the reason she flirts with the ranch hands. After finding out that Lennie loves stroking soft things, she offers to let him stroke her hair, but panics and begins to scream when she feels his strength. Lennie becomes frightened, and in the scuffle, unintentionally breaks her neck. When the other ranch hands find the body, George unhappily realizes that their dream is at an end. George hurries away to find Lennie, hoping he will be at the meeting place they designated at the start of the novel in case Lennie got into trouble, knowing that there is only one thing he can do to save Lennie from the painful death that Curley’s lynch mob intends to deliver.

    George meets Lennie at the designated place, the same spot they camped in the night before they came to the ranch. The two sit together and George retells the beloved story of the bright future together that they will never share. He then shoots Lennie in the back of the head, so that his friend’s inevitable death is painless and happy. Curley, Slim, and Carlson find George seconds after the shooting. Only Slim realizes that George killed Lennie out of love, and gently and consolingly leads him away, while Curley and Carlson look on, unable to comprehend the subdued mood of the two men.

    B. Analytical Characterizations

    In Mice and Men there are six figures. Judging from the intensity of the role undertaken in the development of the story, the main character in this short story is George and Lennie. Meanwhile, other figures are extras (foil), which presented only to create a lively atmosphere to the story, seem more realistic. In this article, which analyzed only characterizations protagonist and the characters are minor.

    1. Lennie
    Although Lennie is among the principal characters in Of Mice and Men, he is perhaps the least dynamic. He undergoes no significant changes, development, or growth throughout the story and remains exactly as the reader encounters him in the opening pages. Simply put, he loves to pet soft things, is blindly devoted to George and their vision of the farm, and possesses incredible physical strength. Nearly every scene in which Lennie appears confirms these and only these characteristics.

    Although Steinbeck’s insistent repetition of these characteristics makes Lennie a rather flat character, Lennie’s simplicity is central to Steinbeck’s conception of the novella. Of Mice and Men is a very short work that manages to build up an extremely powerful impact. Since the tragedy depends upon the outcome seeming to be inevitable, the reader must know from the start that Lennie is doomed, and must be sympathetic to him. Steinbeck achieves these two feats by creating a protagonist who earns the reader’s sympathy because of his utter helplessness in the face of the events that unfold. Lennie is totally defenseless. He cannot avoid the dangers presented by Curley, Curley’s wife, or the world at large. His innocence raises him to a standard of pure goodness that is more poetic and literary than realistic. His enthusiasm for the vision of their future farm proves contagious as he convinces George, Candy, Crooks, and the reader that such a paradise might be possible. But he is a character whom Steinbeck sets up for disaster, a character whose innocence only seems to ensure his inevitable destruction.

    2. George
    George’s personality often reflects both anger and understanding. Of the two men, he is the one who thinks things through and considers how their goals can be reached. Once Candy makes the stake possible, George comes up with the details: where they will get the ranch, how long they must work to pay for it, and how they will have to keep a low profile in order to work for the next month. George also foresees possible complications and gives Lennie advice about what he must do in order to help their future. While George can be very rational and thoughtful, he also gets frustrated and angry with Lennie because the big man cannot control his strength or actions. George repeatedly gets angry, so much so that Lennie knows by heart what it means when George “gives him hell.” But George’s anger quickly fades when he remembers Lennie’s innocence and his inability to remember or think clearly.

    George, unlike other men, has a companion and friend in Lennie. Because of this, Lennie makes George feel special. They are different from all the other guys, and George realizes only too well that they have a special bond. At the ranch, George often plays solitaire, a game for one. Without Lennie, George would be a loner. Even though George gets frustrated by Lennie’s mental weakness, he also feels compassion for his friend. Lennie offers George the opportunity to lay plans, give advice, and, in general, be in charge. Without Lennie, George would be just like the other hands, but with Lennie, George has a strong sense of responsibility. In the end, he even takes responsibility for Lennie’s death. George also understands that Lennie does not have an adult’s sense of guilt and does not understand death or murder beyond it being a “bad thing.” George makes it possible for Lennie — sometimes — to understand at least partial consequences of his actions. Unfortunately, George does not realize how dangerous Lennie can be, and this lack of foresight adds to the downfall of their dream.

    Their dream also sets George apart from the others because it means him and Lennie have a future and something to anticipate. Unlike Lennie, George does not see their dream in terms of rabbits; instead, he sees it in a practical way. Their farm will be one where they can be independent and safe and where he will not have to worry about keeping track of Lennie’s mistakes. They can be secure and in charge of their own lives. However, Lennie is the one who adds the enthusiasm because George never really believed they could swing this farm of their own. He mostly uses the story to give Lennie something to believe in for their future. Only when Candy offers the stake does George actually begin to see that this dream could come true. But, realist that he is, George tells Candy over the lifeless body of Curley’s wife, “I think I knower from the very first. I think I knower we’d never do her. He still wants to hear about it so much I got to thinking maybe we would (be able to have the farm.)” In the end, George Milton is man alone once again.

    3. Candy
    One of the book’s major themes and several of its dominant symbols revolve around Candy. The old handyman, aging and left with only one hand as the result of an accident, worries that the boss will soon declare him useless and demand that he leave the ranch. Of course, life on the ranch—especially Candy’s dog, once an impressive sheep herder but now toothless, foul-smelling, and brittle with age—supports Candy’s fears. Past accomplishments and current emotional ties matter little, as Carson makes clear when he insists that Candy let him put the dog out of its misery. In such a world, Candy’s dog serves as a harsh reminder of the fate that awaits anyone who outlives his usefulness.

    For a brief time, however, the dream of living out his days with George and Lennie on their dream farm distracts Candy from this harsh reality. He deems the few acres of land they describe worthy of his hard-earned life’s savings, which testifies to his desperate need to believe in a world kinder than the one in which he lives. Like George, Candy clings to the idea of having the freedom to take up or set aside work as he chooses. So strong is his devotion to this idea that, even after he discovers that Lennie has killed Curley’s wife, he pleads for himself and George to go ahead and buy the farm as planned.

    4. Curley
    Curley, the boss’ son, is an evil character in Steinbeck’s world. Even Lennie feels the sense of menace when Curley first comes into the bunkhouse. Curley is a “thin young man with a brown face, with brown eyes and a head of tightly curled hair.” According to Candy, Curley is an amateur boxer and is always picking fights, especially with guys who are bigger than he is.

    Curley tries to prove his masculinity by picking fights. Another way to prove him is by marrying a physically attractive woman. His wife is never given a name, but by calling her “Curley’s wife,” Steinbeck indicates she is his possession. Curley refused to let her talk to anyone at the ranch, isolate him from everyone and setting the stage for problems. He made a great show to keep his hand in order to remain soft for the caress, but he was often in a local brothel on Saturday night. While he may strut around the ranch because of his position as the boss’ son, he obviously cannot satisfy his wife and is mean to her. Curley beats up any man who dares to talk to her; the only one he listens to and seems to respect is Slim.

    When Curley picks the fight with Lennie, he does not realize the danger he is in. Once George allows Lennie to fight back, Lennie smashes Curley’s hand, breaking every bone. Curley whimpers like a baby and cries helplessly with the pain. When Lennie kills Curley’s wife, Curley sees this as his opportunity for revenge. In his meanness, he tells Carlson to aim for Lennie’s gut so that Lennie will suffer. This, in turn, causes George to make the decision to kill Lennie mercifully.

    Conclusion

    Tells of two people who strive to realize their dream to own a piece of land. Of Mice and Men is an extremely despondent novel. The novel shows the dreams of a small group of people and then contrasts these dreams with a reality that is unreachable, which they cannot achieve. Even though the dream never becomes reality, Steinbeck does leave us with an optimistic message. George and Lennie do not achieve their dream, but their friendship stands out as a shining example of how people can live and love even in a word of alienation and disconnectedness.

  11. CHARACTERIZATIONS IN “ OF MICE AND MEN” BY JOHN STEINBECK.

    INTRODUCTION

    Similar to other types of literature, fiction (novel, novella, short stories), is processed by the author’s imagination. The material of a fiction is usually based on experience or observation the author of life. Even some novel or short story inspired by a true story. But the material is not presented exactly with the underlying reality. In the process of the creation story, the authors chose and modify the material in accordance with its objectives.
    Given that the story in fiction is based on experience and / or observations on the life of the author, or a true story, fiction seem more realistic or close to real life, making it more familiar to the public or readers. The impression is quite reasonable, since both short stories and novels in general talks about certain aspects commonly found in ordinary people’s lives. Therefore, it is natural that interest in fiction far more than the lovers of poetry or drama.
    Although fiction is a re-disclosure of business life experience (which may not be much different from the reality facing the reader), they often have difficulty understanding the fiction that is read. As a result, human values and artistic delivered authors often can not be understood completely. Most likely the difficulty was caused by a lack of ability among readers of literary analysis.
    This paper is one effort to assist community members in general to appreciate the novels, or stories of Mice and Men in particular. Authors were interested to analyze this story because its author, John Steinbeck, considered one of the most popular American novelists in 1929. He began writing novels in 1929, entitled “Cop of gold”.
    The discussion in this paper focuses on aspects of characterizations. Analyzes were performed using a purely structural approach, because the entire discussion is done only based on the content of the novel.

    ANALYSIS
    A. Synopsis of Mice and Men
    Two migrant field workers in California during the Great Depression—George Milton, an intelligent and cynical man, and Lennie Small, an ironically named man of large stature and immense strength but limited mental abilities—are on their way to a ranch near Soledad (southeast of Salinas, California) to “work up a stake.” They hope to one day attain their shared dream of settling down on their own piece of land. Lennie’s part of the dream is merely to tend to (and touch) soft rabbits on the farm. This dream is one of Lennie’s favorite stories, which George constantly retells. They are fleeing from their previous employment in Weed, California, where they were run out of town after Lennie’s love of stroking soft things resulted in an accusation of attempted rape when he touched a young woman’s dress. It soon becomes clear that the two are close friends and George is Lennie’s protector.

    At the ranch, the situation appears to be menacing and dangerous, especially when the pair is confronted by Curley—the boss’s small-statures aggressive son with an inferiority complex and who dislikes larger men—leaving the gentle giant Lennie potentially vulnerable. Curley’s flirtatious and provocative wife, to whom Lennie is instantly attracted, poses a problem as well. In sharp contrast to these two characters, the pair also meets Slim, the kind, intelligent and intuitive jerk line skinner who agrees to give Lennie one of the puppies his dog has recently given birth to, and another to an old ranch hand named Candy.

    Amazingly, and in spite of the potential problems on the ranch, their dream leaps towards reality when Candy, the aged, one-handed ranch-hand, offers to pitch in with George and Lennie so that they can buy a farm at the end of the month in return for permission to live with them on it. The trio is ecstatic, but their joy is overshadowed when Curley attacks Lennie and Lennie, urged on by George, catches his fist and crushes it, reminding the group there are still obstacles to overcome before their goal is reached.

    Nevertheless, George feels more relaxed, since the dream seems just within their grasp, to the extent that he even leaves Lennie behind on the ranch while he goes into town with the other ranch hands. Lennie wanders into the stable, and chats with Crooks, the bitter, yet educated stable buck, who is isolated from the other workers because he is black. Candy finds them and they discuss their plans for the farm with Crooks, who cannot resist asking them if he can hoe a garden patch on the farm, despite scorning the possibility of achieving the dream. Curley’s wife makes another appearance and flirts with the men, especially Lennie. However, her spiteful side is shown when she belittles them and is especially harsh towards Crooks because of his race.

    Lennie accidentally kills his puppy while stroking it. Curley’s wife enters and tries to speak to Lennie, admitting that she is lonely, how her dreams of becoming a movie star crashed, revealing the reason she flirts with the ranch hands. After finding out that Lennie loves stroking soft things, she offers to let him stroke her hair, but panics and begins to scream when she feels his strength. Lennie becomes frightened, and in the scuffle, unintentionally breaks her neck. When the other ranch hands find the body, George unhappily realizes that their dream is at an end. George hurries away to find Lennie, hoping he will be at the meeting place they designated at the start of the novel in case Lennie got into trouble, knowing that there is only one thing he can do to save Lennie from the painful death that Curley’s lynch mob intends to deliver.

    George meets Lennie at the designated place, the same spot they camped in the night before they came to the ranch. The two sit together and George retells the beloved story of the bright future together that they will never share. He then shoots Lennie in the back of the head, so that his friend’s inevitable death is painless and happy. Curley, Slim, and Carlson find George seconds after the shooting. Only Slim realizes that George killed Lennie out of love, and gently and consolingly leads him away, while Curley and Carlson look on, unable to comprehend the subdued mood of the two men.

    B. Analytical Characterizations

    In Mice and Men there are six figures. Judging from the intensity of the role undertaken in the development of the story, the main character in this short story is George and Lennie. Meanwhile, other figures are extras (foil), which presented only to create a lively atmosphere to the story, seem more realistic. In this article, which analyzed only characterizations protagonist and the characters are minor.

    1. Lennie
    Although Lennie is among the principal characters in Of Mice and Men, he is perhaps the least dynamic. He undergoes no significant changes, development, or growth throughout the story and remains exactly as the reader encounters him in the opening pages. Simply put, he loves to pet soft things, is blindly devoted to George and their vision of the farm, and possesses incredible physical strength. Nearly every scene in which Lennie appears confirms these and only these characteristics.
    Although Steinbeck’s insistent repetition of these characteristics makes Lennie a rather flat character, Lennie’s simplicity is central to Steinbeck’s conception of the novella. Of Mice and Men is a very short work that manages to build up an extremely powerful impact. Since the tragedy depends upon the outcome seeming to be inevitable, the reader must know from the start that Lennie is doomed, and must be sympathetic to him. Steinbeck achieves these two feats by creating a protagonist who earns the reader’s sympathy because of his utter helplessness in the face of the events that unfold. Lennie is totally defenseless. He cannot avoid the dangers presented by Curley, Curley’s wife, or the world at large. His innocence raises him to a standard of pure goodness that is more poetic and literary than realistic. His enthusiasm for the vision of their future farm proves contagious as he convinces George, Candy, Crooks, and the reader that such a paradise might be possible. But he is a character whom Steinbeck sets up for disaster, a character whose innocence only seems to ensure his inevitable destruction.

    2. George
    George’s personality often reflects both anger and understanding. Of the two men, he is the one who thinks things through and considers how their goals can be reached. Once Candy makes the stake possible, George comes up with the details: where they will get the ranch, how long they must work to pay for it, and how they will have to keep a low profile in order to work for the next month. George also foresees possible complications and gives Lennie advice about what he must do in order to help their future. While George can be very rational and thoughtful, he also gets frustrated and angry with Lennie because the big man cannot control his strength or actions. George repeatedly gets angry, so much so that Lennie knows by heart what it means when George “gives him hell.” But George’s anger quickly fades when he remembers Lennie’s innocence and his inability to remember or think clearly.
    George, unlike other men, has a companion and friend in Lennie. Because of this, Lennie makes George feel special. They are different from all the other guys, and George realizes only too well that they have a special bond. At the ranch, George often plays solitaire, a game for one. Without Lennie, George would be a loner. Even though George gets frustrated by Lennie’s mental weakness, he also feels compassion for his friend. Lennie offers George the opportunity to lay plans, give advice, and, in general, be in charge. Without Lennie, George would be just like the other hands, but with Lennie, George has a strong sense of responsibility. In the end, he even takes responsibility for Lennie’s death. George also understands that Lennie does not have an adult’s sense of guilt and does not understand death or murder beyond it being a “bad thing.” George makes it possible for Lennie — sometimes — to understand at least partial consequences of his actions. Unfortunately, George does not realize how dangerous Lennie can be, and this lack of foresight adds to the downfall of their dream.
    Their dream also sets George apart from the others because it means him and Lennie have a future and something to anticipate. Unlike Lennie, George does not see their dream in terms of rabbits; instead, he sees it in a practical way. Their farm will be one where they can be independent and safe and where he will not have to worry about keeping track of Lennie’s mistakes. They can be secure and in charge of their own lives. However, Lennie is the one who adds the enthusiasm because George never really believed they could swing this farm of their own. He mostly uses the story to give Lennie something to believe in for their future. Only when Candy offers the stake does George actually begin to see that this dream could come true. But, realist that he is, George tells Candy over the lifeless body of Curley’s wife, “I think I knower from the very first. I think I knower we’d never do her. He still wants to hear about it so much I got to thinking maybe we would (be able to have the farm.)” In the end, George Milton is man alone once again.

    3. Candy
    One of the book’s major themes and several of its dominant symbols revolve around Candy. The old handyman, aging and left with only one hand as the result of an accident, worries that the boss will soon declare him useless and demand that he leave the ranch. Of course, life on the ranch—especially Candy’s dog, once an impressive sheep herder but now toothless, foul-smelling, and brittle with age—supports Candy’s fears. Past accomplishments and current emotional ties matter little, as Carson makes clear when he insists that Candy let him put the dog out of its misery. In such a world, Candy’s dog serves as a harsh reminder of the fate that awaits anyone who outlives his usefulness.
    For a brief time, however, the dream of living out his days with George and Lennie on their dream farm distracts Candy from this harsh reality. He deems the few acres of land they describe worthy of his hard-earned life’s savings, which testifies to his desperate need to believe in a world kinder than the one in which he lives. Like George, Candy clings to the idea of having the freedom to take up or set aside work as he chooses. So strong is his devotion to this idea that, even after he discovers that Lennie has killed Curley’s wife, he pleads for himself and George to go ahead and buy the farm as planned.

    4. Curley
    Curley, the boss’ son, is an evil character in Steinbeck’s world. Even Lennie feels the sense of menace when Curley first comes into the bunkhouse. Curley is a “thin young man with a brown face, with brown eyes and a head of tightly curled hair.” According to Candy, Curley is an amateur boxer and is always picking fights, especially with guys who are bigger than he is.
    Curley tries to prove his masculinity by picking fights. Another way to prove him is by marrying a physically attractive woman. His wife is never given a name, but by calling her “Curley’s wife,” Steinbeck indicates she is his possession. Curley refused to let her talk to anyone at the ranch, isolate him from everyone and setting the stage for problems. He made a great show to keep his hand in order to remain soft for the caress, but he was often in a local brothel on Saturday night. While he may strut around the ranch because of his position as the boss’ son, he obviously cannot satisfy his wife and is mean to her. Curley beats up any man who dares to talk to her; the only one he listens to and seems to respect is Slim.
    When Curley picks the fight with Lennie, he does not realize the danger he is in. Once George allows Lennie to fight back, Lennie smashes Curley’s hand, breaking every bone. Curley whimpers like a baby and cries helplessly with the pain. When Lennie kills Curley’s wife, Curley sees this as his opportunity for revenge. In his meanness, he tells Carlson to aim for Lennie’s gut so that Lennie will suffer. This, in turn, causes George to make the decision to kill Lennie mercifully.

    Conclusion

    Tells of two people who strive to realize their dream to own a piece of land. Of Mice and Men is an extremely despondent novel. The novel shows the dreams of a small group of people and then contrasts these dreams with a reality that is unreachable, which they cannot achieve. Even though the dream never becomes reality, Steinbeck does leave us with an optimistic message. George and Lennie do not achieve their dream, but their friendship stands out as a shining example of how people can live and love even in a word of alienation and disconnectedness.

  12. hi sir, i’m sorry i’m forgot to posting the title i choose fat and thin by Anton Chekov

  13. hi sir, i’m going to change my analyze, now i’m going to analyze “Young Goodman Brown” by Nathaniel Hawthorne

  14. Hi friends.. I’m going to analyze »”The Princess and the Pea” by Hans Christian Andersen

  15. Hi all…. I’m going to analyze “King Midas” by Upton Sinclair

  16. Hi all…. I’m going to analyze “King Midas” by Upton Sinclair..

  17. Good afternoon Mr.Parlin. I’m so sorry late to confirm the short story to analyze for the mid-term assignment. But, I have done my assignment and I analyze “The Sad Story Of The Yaoya’s Daughter” by Grace James. Thank you. GBU.

  18. hey friends ..i’m going to analyze “The Little Mermaid ” by Hans Christian Andersen

  19. hello friends,……
    I have changed my short story and I also have analyzed it.
    I have analyzed,” The princesses and the puma” by O Henry

  20. hi Sir n friends.. I’m going to analyze ” A Day’s wait ” short story by Hemingway..

  21. Dear Sir,

    I am going to analyze “A Good Man Is Hard to Find” is a short story written by Flannery O’Connor

  22. friends, i change my short story
    i analyze ” A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens. thanks

  23. Sir I change my short story
    I analyze “The Twelve Dancing Princesses” by Brothers Grimm.
    Thank you Sir..

  24. sir i change.
    i will analyze ‘ The Tell- Tale Heart’ by Edgar Allen Poe
    thankyou sir

  25. Because the happy prince has already chosen by Yuliana, I choose the other short story, the the title is “Hobnail” by Crystal Arbogast

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